Contemporary Political Youth Culture and Communication Symposium: Call for Papers

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At the University of York, UK, on 18-20 July 2016, a symposium on Contemporary Political Youth Culture and Communication. Consider submitting a proposal for presenting your work.

The Symposium

Marking the launch of the Centre for Political Youth Culture and Communication (CPAC) this two-day international symposium explores the socio-cultural factors influencing the civic engagement of young people and its means of communicative expression. Young networking citizens in many parts of the world today play a crucial role in shaping the future prospects for democratic societies. The styles, nature and means of their political engagement is therefore of increasing importance to policy-makers and academics alike. This event is focused upon the communicative, emotional, embodied, and aesthetical modes of youth citizenship. It examines the social construction of the political identities of young people within the context of widening social inequality, climate change, reflexive individualism and a networked social media ecology. We welcome papers drawing upon research and theory that address questions of contemporary political youth culture including, but not limited to, such topics as: citizenship norms; political talk; social networking; precarious employment; celebrity politics; personalization; identity politics; social movement protest; community politics; political socialization; civic education; political education; transnational politics; populist parties; youth campaigns; migration politics; and electoral engagement.

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Keynote Speakers

Prof. Henrik Bang, University of Copenhagen and Canberra University
Prof. Lance Bennett, University of Washington
Prof. Donatella della Porta, European University Institute, Florenze

Conference organisers:
Brian D. Loader, University of York, brian.loader@york.ac.uk
Nathan Manning, University of York, nathan.manning@york.ac.uk
Nisha Kapoor, University of York, nisha.kapoor@york.ac.uk

KEY DATES
Please submit title, abstract and brief biog for consideration to brian.loader@york.ac.uk
by Monday 14th March 2016.
Notification of decision. Monday 21st March, 2016

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Being There – a personal perspective on the culture of innovation at Bell Labs

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Michael Noll has been teaching and conducting research on communication and technology since the early 1980s, most recently as a Professor of Communication at the Annenberg School for Communication & Journalism at USC. Prior to joining Annenberg, he was an engineer at Bell Labs in its heyday, from 1961-1971. At Bell Labs, Michael pioneered in such areas as digital art, three-dimensional displays, and tactile communication, and video communication. Michael as drafted in to design the prototype of video conferencing used in Stanley Kubrick classic film, 2001 Space Odyssey. Professor Noll has been supporting the Quello Center, such as through his blogs on technology and policy, and also drafting a book that reflects on his experience at the center of innovation in communication technology before the locus of innovation shifted to Silicon Valley. While so much has been written about the culture of Silicon Valley, relatively little has been written about Bell Labs. Professor Noll’s book helps rectify this imbalance. Written in a clear and accessible style, Michael blends personal anecdotes and engineering insights into an informative and engaging history of this center, illuminating the dynamics of a culture that fostered innovative people and ideas used round the world.

− Bill Dutton, Director of the Quello Center

Memories: A Personal History of Bell Telephone Laboratories

by A. Michael Noll

Abstract

This manuscript tells the story of Bell Labs, concentrating mostly on the 1960s, from the personal perspective of the author who actually was employed at its Murray Hill laboratory as an engineer and researcher. Bell Labs continued the tradition of Thomas Alva Edison’s invention factory and had an environment that today is associated with Silicon Valley. The buildings, various locations, amenities, and most important—the people—are described to give a sense of what it was like to be at Bell Labs and why so many wanted to work there and contribute to its many inventions and discoveries.

Biographical Sketch: A. MICHAEL NOLL is professor emeritus at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism at the University of Southern California. During most of the 1960s, he was employed as a Member of Technical Staff at Bell Telephone Laboratories in Murray Hill, NJ, and recently worked on the papers of Dr. William O. Baker, who was vice president of research during what many consider the “golden years” of Bell Labs. He brings this personal knowledge and perspective to this manuscript.

This manuscript is a work in progress, distributed as a working paper of the Quello Center at Michigan State University for educational use. The author welcomes comments and questions on this site as he moves this toward publication.

The manuscript can be downloaded here: Memories-Noll.

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