Quello Postdoctoral Fellowship in Media and Information Policy, Michigan State University

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We have opened a search for a Quello Postdoctoral Fellow in Media and Information Policy at Michigan State University. [MSU Job Posting #1180] This is in addition to the search for an Assistant Research Professor.

William Dutton, the Quello Professor of Media and Information Policy and Director of the Quello Center in the Department of Media and Information at Michigan State University (MSU), is seeking to hire a Postdoctoral Fellow for a 1 year position, with the potential for renewal. The position is available beginning as soon as July 1, 2015. The postdoc will work with Professor Dutton on existing Quello research projects and in developing proposals for further research. Projects focus on media, information and Internet policy, regulation and governance, such as the Center’s Network Neutrality Impact Study. The appointment would enable candidates to pursue their own research of relevance to the Center as well as supporting ongoing Quello Center researchwork, with the potential for raising support for continuation beyond the first year.

Applicants should explain the relevance of their background and interests to the mission and work of the Quello Center. Candidates must have defended their dissertation prior to beginning the postdoctoral fellowship. A PhD is normally required in one of the many fields that contribute to the development and study of information, media and communication policy, such as Political Science, Law (where a J.D. degree is expected), Policy, Economics, Sociology, Psychology, Communication, New Media, Internet Studies, Information Studies, or a related field. Candidates must have: strong methodological training and skills of relevance to policy research, such as in modeling or specific social research methods; experience writing grant proposals; good organizational and time management skills; and evidence of the ability to work well as part of a team. The quality of prior publications and grant writing experience will be key in evaluating all applications.

The Postdoctoral Fellow is a 12 month, full-time appointment, with salary up to $45,000 depending upon qualifications. Benefits are also provided. See http://grad.msu.edu/pdo/ and http://www.hr.msu.edu/benefits/ for more information on postdoctoral training and benefits at MSU.

Questions may be addressed to the Director of the Quello Center at Quello@msu.edu, but the following application materials must be submitted via the MSU online system for job posting #1180 at the MSU Job Postings Web site: 1) a cover letter describing why you are interested in this position, and what training, skills, research and methodological background you would bring to the work of the Quello Center and this position; 2) an up-to-date and complete curriculum vitae; 3) one or two samples of your best work; and 4) the names and contact information for three references. The review of applications will begin immediately and continue until a suitable candidate is selected.

Notes:

The Quello Center seeks to stimulate and inform debate on media, communication and information policy for our digital age. It pursues research that questions taken for granted assumptions about the implications of technology, policy and regulation, and seeks to collaborate with other centers of excellence in research on the social and economic implications of our digital age and the policy and management issues raised by these developments.Information about the Quello Center: http://quello.msu.edu

The Center is based in the Department of Media and Information, which is home to a dynamic, interdisciplinary faculty internationally known for their research on the uses and implications of information and communication technology and policy.

MSU is an affirmative-action, equal opportunity employer. MSU is committed to achieving excellence through cultural diversity. The university actively encourages applications and/or nominations of women, persons of color, veterans and persons with disabilities.

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Alexander Heffner on ‘Millennials, Public Media and The Future of Civil Discourse’

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Alexander Heffner delivered an engaging Quello Center Lecture on the engagement of ‘millennials’ in public media, issues and discourse. You are welcome to view the lecture, delivered on 18 March 2015, by going to the video below.

Quello Lecture and Panel on ‘Millennials, Public Media and The Future of Civil Discourse’ by Alexander Heffner (NEW) from Quello Center on Vimeo.

Alexander is seeking, through his work on ‘Open Minds’, a way to foster a more ‘civic-minded journalism culture, non-adversarial broadcasting in the public interest, and critical exploration of prosocial ideas.’ His talk can be viewed here, along with responses from two colleagues at MSU follow his talk, Eric Freedman, a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist at MSU, and Gary Reid, the Director of WKAR in East Lansing, Michigan. The responses and discussion challenge the concept of ‘millennials’, what is ‘newsworthy’ v ‘viral’ and what the key issues are in the future of public discourse – changing audiences, business models, the role of the journalist, and the quality of discourse. Optimists and pessimists about the future of public discourse can be found in the discussion.

Alexander is a graduate of Andover and Harvard, is host of The Open Mind on PBS Channel THIRTEEN/WNET and CUNY TV. Eric Freedman is the Knight Chair in environmental journalism and director of Capital News Service at MSU’s School of Journalism. Before joining the faculty full-time in 1996, Freedman was a reporter. Gary Reid is the Director of Broadcasting and General Manager of WDBM-FM, WKAR-AM/FM/TV. He is a University Distinguished Senior Specialist in the Department of Media and Information at MSU and an Associate Director of the Quello Center.

Alexander’s lecture is about 25 minutes, including my introduction, with two short responses, and discussion. We’d welcome any comments or feedback on this talk here on the Quello Center blog.

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New Business Models for New Media

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Professor Constantinos K. Coursaris gave a seminar on the business models behind new media. In this short video, he is asked to summarize the new business models – and succinctly does so. Dr Coursaris is the Director of Graduate Studies and an Associate Professor and Associate Director in the Department of Media and Information in MSU’s College of Communication Arts and Sciences.

Coursaris Quello Interview from Quello Center on Vimeo.

Constantinos is also a Faculty Researcher in Usability/Accessibility Research and Consulting. In this area, he studies user motivations, expectations, and experiences with new media and the consequent design implications with a focus on social systems. His current research interests lie in the intersection of usability and mobile technologies for the purpose of health and/or commercial applications. You can follow him @DrCoursaris

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Charles Steinfield on Enterprise Social Media: Implications for Business Collaboration and Knowledge Management

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Prior to a presentation for the Quello Center, Professor Charles Steinfield was interviewed by Bill Dutton about his work on ‘enterprise social media’, the subject of this presentation. He explains what enterprise social media are, why they are becoming popular across business and industry, and their implications – intended and sometimes unintended. Charles Steinfield is a professor in the Department of Media and Information at Michigan State University. In addition to his faculty position, Steinfield participates with the MSU Eli Broad College of Business Information Technology Management Program and is a member of the campus-wide Faculty of Computing and Information. He is also a research associate in the Quello Center for Telecommunications Management and Law at MSU and a Faculty Associate for the MSU College of Law Intellectual Property and Communications Law Program. Professor Steinfield’s research focuses on the organizational and social impacts of new communication technologies, with recent projects examining the social capital implications of online social network sites, understanding barriers to industry-wide diffusion to e-commerce standards, and the role of ICTs in economic development.

Enterprise Social Media from Quello Center on Vimeo.

A recent article Professor Steinfield co-authored with his colleagues on the enterprise social media project is at: http://conferences.computer.org/hicss/2015/papers/7367a763.pdf

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Steve Wildman on the Future of Media Content Delivery

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The Quello Center Advisory Board identified the future of content delivery as one of the Center’s most critical issues for research. Late in 2014, Professor Steve Wildman provided an overview of the prospects for new forms of content delivery to a group of visiting executives. Prior to his lecture, Bill Dutton interviewed him about the key points he planned to cover. You’ve find this video of this interview to be a succinct summary of major issues facing the future of broadcasting and the media more generally. We’d welcome your comments – whether you agree to disagree with the future painted by Professor Wildman.

Delivering Media Content in a New Technological Environment: An Exploration of Policy Implications from Quello Center on Vimeo.

His video is at: https://vimeo.com/110827928

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Looking Back at the Future of the Field by Avshalom Ginosar

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The headline above was the title of a Quello Center roundtable discussion this afternoon, with the participation of several senior figures of the College of Communication Arts and Sciences, chaired by Professor William Dutton.

Here are some of my reflections as an outsider – listener:

First, pay attention to the fact that the topic is “the future of the field“. Is it clear to everyone what field we are talking about? Obviously, you think of “Communication” as the “field”; however it is not so obvious, and what Communication is, as an academic field, is not so obvious as well. Actually, this was the core issue of the discussion in the seminar: the definition and the boundaries of “the field”.

Is it an interdisciplinary or multidisciplinary research field? Can scholars from computer sciences, public policy, health education, etc. be considered as communication scholars as well? Are Internet studies, technology engineering studies, etc. part of any Communication department’s syllabus? Are there common research interests for scholars from the Department of Communication, the Department of Media and Information, and the School of Journalism (all of them under the umbrella of the College of Communication Arts and Sciences at MSU)? Does the multifaceted nature of the College reflect diversity or fragmentation in the field? Is it positive or negative? All these questions and many others were addressed as topics of the discussion.

For me, as a relatively young scholar (although not such a young man), this diversity in the field is a blessing; it opens a variety of opportunities; it makes “Communication” a very exciting academic field; it allows a real thorough understanding of the social reality within which we live in the 21st century. So yes, old media as well as new media, media policy as well as media technology, journalism as an occupation as well as journalism as a societal phenomenon; Internet as an infrastructure, a fascinating technology, and a public sphere, and so on… All of these are “Communication” for me.

Therefore, I do not find any need for defining or re-defining the field, I do not see any problem with the fact that there are no precise boundaries to the field, and I can only appreciate the fact that scholars of Communication can contribute to other scholarly fields and can be informed by the contributions of other scholars from various disciplines as well.

Professor James Dearing

Professor James Dearing

 

Professor Bradley Greenberg

Professor Bradley Greenberg

Avshalom Ginosar, PhD, Communication Department, The Academic College of Yezreel Valley

Visiting Scholar, The Quello Center, The Department of Media & Information, The College of Communication Arts & Sciences, Michigan State University

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Doctoral Opportunities in Media and Information Studies

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The Quello Center is anchored in the Department of Media and Information at MSU, which provides attractive opportunities for doctoral studies with a multi-disciplinary faculty. The Media and Information Studies (MIS) PhD program at Michigan State University would like to hear from outstanding students who wish to join an innovative interdisciplinary program of study at the intersection of the social sciences, humanities, including the study of  socio technical systems, Internet studies, and communication policy and governance. Our diverse faculty develops and applies transformative knowledge about media and society and evolving information and communication technologies. The program engages students to become active scholars, teachers, and leaders in the media and information fields.

Offered jointly by the Department of Advertising+Public Relations, the School of Journalism, and the Department of Media and Information, the MIS PhD program give students access to fifty PhD faculty with research interests that span important current and emerging issues in media and information studies. Students get involved early on in projects, complementing theoretical coursework with hands-on research experiences.

Particularly strong research interests of our faculty include:

New this year is an option for undergraduates interested in pursuing advanced studies through an accelerated MA program leading to early admission to our PhD program.

Over 90 percent of our current students are supported by graduate teaching and research assistantships with generous stipends of $2000 per month, tuition remission, and health benefits . University fellowships, dissertation completion fellowships, summer research fellowships, and stipends for travel to academic conferences round out the resources available for students.

Over three-fourths of our graduates are hired into faculty positions at four-year institutions at graduation. They are found in departments of mass media, journalism, advertising, public relations, and information studies across the United States and around the world. Others go on to careers in public service and business.

The National Communication Association (NCA), in their most recent doctoral program reputation study, ranked MSU’s Ph.D. programs as No. 1 in educating researchers in communication technology, and in the top four in mass communication. Michigan State University ranked third in frequency of faculty publication in communication in a study reported in The Electronic Journal of Communication in 2012. QS World University rankings place MSU 11th in the world and 7th in the U.S. in communication and media studies.

East Lansing and the greater Lansing area offer a vibrant cultural environment with easy access to a variety of outdoor activities and the scenic beauty of our state year-round. Blending urban and sub-urban living, it is one of the nation’s most affordable places to complete a doctoral program in media and information studies.

To learn more, see the MIS web page and visit Facebook to see what is happening this week.

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