Celebration to Recognize Endowed Faculty at MSU

by

I was honored to take part in a celebration of the many endowed faculty at MSU. From the College of Communication Arts and Sciences #comartsci, a medallion was given to me – Bill Dutton – as the James H. and Mary B. Quello Professor of Media and Information Policy, in the Department of Media and Information, and John C. Besley, the Ellis N. Brandt Chair in Public Relations, and noted among many other things for his work on public attitudes toward science and scientists. Dean Prabu David was on hand to congratulate us.

John Besley, Prabu David, Bill Dutton, 2017

Dean David (CAS), Dean Floden (Education), & Gloria Floden

My major take away from this event is the need and value for the College #comartsci to attract more endowed professorships. They are indeed one way to attract faculty to the university and a terrific way to recognize alumni and others who give to the university. The best news of the event was a reminder that MSU was named at one of the world’s 50 powerhouse universities – so much potential for colleagues to fulfill in the coming years.

Bill, Gloria, Bob

Tags: , , , ,


Digital Archive of James Quello’s Papers

by

The Quello Center is off and running in creating a digital archive of James H. Quello’s papers. Our archive team includes myself, having never created such an archive, plus Anne Marie Salter at the Center, Valeta Winsloff from Media and Information who supports our design work and blogging, Scout Calvert with the MSU Library, who is orchestrating this project, and Lauren E. Lincoln-Chavez, who has hands on experience in developing archives and special collections, and is based in Detroit.

The collection contains over 1,000 papers, including speeches, statements, letters, and remarks by James Quello during his long tenure as an FCC Commissioner. To this we will be adding our collection of photographs, and videos, as well as photos of his many awards and honors. This promises to be another of the many fun and rewarding projects of the Center.

The archive will be part of our WordPress blog and publicly accessible to anyone who might want a view of over two decades at the FCC through the words of one of its longest serving and most colorful commissioners. I read one of his papers from 1974 saying the he is willing to forgive journalists for getting things wrong at times (before there was a term ‘fake news’) in order to protect freedom of the press, and I imagine he would say the same thing about the users of social media today.

Generally, sifting through this collection is addictive as you follow the history of such issues as the fairness doctrine, cross-ownership rules, and more. I’ll keep you posted on our progress.

LtoR: Aleks, Bill, Valeta, Anne Marie, Lauren, Scout

Tags: , , , , ,


Another Successful Meaningful Play Conference

by

Johannes Bauer on Meaningful Play 2016

Thanks to Brian, Casey and Carrie (the three co-chairs of Meaningful Play 2016) as well as all other faculty and students (among them Valeta, Will, Andrew, Luke, Jeremy, Ricardo, Robby, Wei, Constantinos, and many others) who were involved in organizing the conference, the program committee, and the onsite logistics! Beth gave an inspiring keynote that concluded the conference on a high note! I was equally impressed by the quality of theoretical and applied research and the innovative nature of the many game projects reported and exhibited.

The conference was a great forum for the growing number of MSU researchers with a shared interest in games to interact and network with other MSU researchers and with the attendees from the US and abroad. Until this conference, I was not fully aware of the size and diversity of the group of MSU researchers. I interacted with individuals from the Colleges of Social Science; Education; Arts and Letters; Lyman Briggs; and our college (and am sure there probably were more). Also rewarding to see that several of them are graduates of the Serious Games Certificate Program. screen-shot-2016-10-22-at-17-03-51

Johannes Bauer, Chair
Department of Media and Information

Tags: , , , , , , ,


A New Year at the Quello Center: Research, Research, Research

by

With the start of a new academic year, the Quello Center is progressing on many fronts, but particularly in the development of new research. Given awards for two recent projects, one on wireless access for the last mile, and another on the role of search in shaping political opinions, based on cross-national comparative research in North America and Europe, our set of projects continues to grow. It is wonderful to see our team so fully occupied with research projects and proposals.

This has been possible through the hard work and creative ideas of our core research team, all of who remain in place for the coming year. These researchers include:

Dr Bianca Reisdorf, first hired as a Quello postdoctoral researcher last year, has been promoted to Assistant Director of the Quello Center, and Assistant Professor in the Department of Media and Information. Bianca began research on digital inequalities while a DPhil student at the OII at the University of Oxford, and is continuing this stream of research here at the Quello Center in work on digital divides in Michigan and across the US, as well as on our survey components of our comparative study of the use of Internet search in politics.

Research Team Members R.V. Rikard, Bibi Reisdorf, Mitch Shapiro, Aleks Yankelevich

Research Team Members R.V. Rikard, Bibi Reisdorf, Mitch Shapiro, Aleks Yankelevich

Dr Aleksandr Yankelevich, our Research Assistant Professor, who joined the Quello Center after four years at the FCC, which won him the FCC’s Excellence in Economic Analysis Award. He is leading research on wireless innovation for last mile access (WILMA), where he is focused on analysis of the use of spectrum for the last mile, and the policy are regulatory constraints they entail. And he has developed a proposal with Professor Johannes Bauer to deepen our research on the actual impacts of network neutrality, focusing on investment patterns within the communication industry.

Mitch Shapiro, is a Quello researcher, currently focused on the WILMA project, undertaking case studies of initiatives at providing last mile access across the US. He brings to the Quello Center his extensive experience working as a consultant for academic institutions, such as Harvard’s Berkman Center, and industry, such as with Strategic Networks Group and Pulse Broadband; Pike & Fischer, a unit of the Bureau of National Affairs (now Bloomberg BNA); Pangrac & Associates, Probe Reseach and Paul Kagan Associates.

Based on the accomplishments of this core team over the past year, we have been able to open a new position for a post-doctoral researcher that we will be advertising shortly. In addition, we have been able to complement this team with part-time researchers based in Detroit, who are helping with interviews of a sample of over 1,300 nonprofit organizations working to support the development of a city that some have called the New Berlin. Our interviews are shedding light on the role of the Internet and social media in the activities of organizations so embedded in interpersonal networks across the city.

So the new academic year is promising more research to build on the strength of our last year. If you are asking ‘What is all this research about?’ the answer is to inform and stimulate debate on media and information policy and practice in our digital age.

Follow us and join our seminars and lectures as time permits.

Bill Dutton

Tags: , , , , ,


Congratulations to R.V. Rikard from your Quello Center Colleagues

by

The Quello Center congratulates Dr. R.V. Rikard on his promotion to a Senior Research Associate in MSU’s Department of Media and Information. Over the last two years, Dr Rikard has become a highly valued – go to – colleague for our Center. He has helped on grant proposals in the areas of big data, complex data management, and more. In announcing this promotion, Professor Johannes Bauer, Chair of the Department, praised R.V.’s excellence in methods and statistics, which he brings to his work on Trifecta (Technology and Innovation for Health), with Professor Shelia Cotten, but also shares to the entire department.

Research Team Members R.V. Rikard, Bibi Reisdorf, Mitch Shapiro, Aleks Yankelevich

Research Team Members R.V. Rikard, Bibi Reisdorf, Mitch Shapiro, Aleks Yankelevich

Intellectually curious, R.V. is a regular participant in Quello Center lectures, seminars, and events, bringing his sense of humor and sharp wit into the academic climate of the College of Communication Arts & Sciences. He is a strong contributor to our academic community. He even follows us on Twitter @QuelloCenter and Facebook.

So keep retweeting, R.V., and congratulations. Seriously well done. All of us at the Quello Center look forward to continuing our collaboration. You can count on us to keep darkening your door.

Tags: , , , , , ,


Bob LaRose Leaving Lecture on Media Habits

by

Bob LaRose is giving a leaving lecture entitled ‘The Challenge of Media Habits’ on April 4th at 1:30PM in CAS Rm 145 at MSU. Bob is a distinguished professor at MSU, and possibly most widely known for his multi-edition text with Joseph Straubhaar and Lucinda Davenport, entitled ‘Media Now‘ – which is now in its 9th edition. He has been one of the early pioneers in research on new media, being one of the first graduates of the Annenberg School of Communication at USC, when the late Fred Williams, the founding Dean, launched the School with a new media focus. Traditions in the study of the media infuse his work on new media, leading him to address topics around effects, and habits, that are less prominent among the born new media researchers. That said, you can increasingly recognize developing habits around the use of such new media as social media and Twitter, so the old and new media research traditions are beginning to connect.

It seems clear that Bob LaRose has had a major influence on the Department of Media and Information at MSU, which seeks to bring together the study of media and information technologies and society. He will be missed in the Department and at the Quello Center, where he led some roundtables on such issues as social media effects, and also donated a couple of his paintings, which remain on the walls of the Center. Screen Shot 2016-04-01 at 10.34.19

Bob LaRose's Gift to Quello

Bob LaRose’s Gift to Quello

Tags: , , , , , ,


The FCC Spectrum Auction and the Future of Public Broadcasting: The Case at MSU and Greater Lansing

by

Michigan State University (MSU) held a lively forum on 4 January 2016 to discuss the pending decision by the university on whether or not to participate in the FCC’s spectrum incentive auction. A second forum will be held on the 11th of January at 7pm in the College of Communication Arts & Sciences.

What might sound like a technically and financially arcane set of issues came to life for many in the questions of the 300 some participants who packed the auditorium on the 4th of January. It appeared as if every-other person attending the forum had their hand up at some point to comment or ask a question. Credit to MSU for holding these forums, and to the University’s President, Lou Anna Simon (2015), for being interviewed on WKAR’s ‘Current State’ in December about the pending decision.

If MSU were to auction off its broadcasting spectrum, as explained at the forum, this would spell the end of over-the-air (OTA) broadcasting of WKAR public television. Not being over the air, it will lose its financial support from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, and its must carry status for cable and satellite providers. While it will not affect WKAR radio, it would threaten the existence of public broadcasting in the greater Lansing community, and similar communities, as well as the vitality of public broadcasting nationally (CPB 2014: chapter 3). Not surprisingly, the audience on 4 January was ‘overwhelmingly negative’ (Wolcott 2016). imgres

Why do this?

As the auction suggests, the ‘incentive’ is financial. Potentially hundreds of millions of dollars for the University, with no strings attached on how it is spent. However, there are seriously hard questions that need to be addressed before deciding whether such eye-watering payoffs for the University would really be a windfall or even justified at this point in time.

First, the same spectrum is likely to increase in value in the near future. Wireless is the most dynamic, fastest growing infrastructure for the development of innovative approaches to connectivity generally, but also mobile Internet, the Internet of Things, and future sensor networks associated with intelligent cities and transportation (Dutton et al 2014). There is little question that wireless spectrum is poised to become far more valuable than it is now, and within a short space of time. There is almost no question that any price MSU receives now will be short of what it will be worth in the space of 5-10 years. So is this too soon to auction it off, even if viewed on purely financial terms?

Secondly, those in the community who depend on OTA television will lose access to public television, and WKAR in particular. Only about three-fourths of Michiganians are online. In central Lansing, this could be closer to fifty percent. And many residents of the greater Lansing community are dependent on over-the-air broadcasting. The elderly, minorities, rural residents, and the less well to do, are among the most dependent on OTA broadcasting, and most in need of good high-quality programming, educational, and public-oriented programming (Lawson 2015).

Many believe that the Internet and related digital media will compensate for this loss. The idea is that digital media, such as the Internet, can be used to replace lost spectrum. In the short-term (for the next 5-10 years at least) this is a false hope. There are a growing number of ‘cord-nevers’ (never subscribing to cable or satellite services) and cord-cutters (those who stop subscribing) because they rely more on Internet access and streaming video services. This will reduce the likelihood of cable and satellite providers carrying public broadcasting.

Moreover, the fact that more people are moving to view television and film content over the Internet is not to say that everyone is. The reality is far from this imagined future. Digital divides in access to the Internet have been persistent in developed nations, such as the United States, and will not be closed in the next five to ten years. Michigan is about average among states across the US in access to the Internet, but that covers up major variations across socioeconomic groups, where access is dramatically variable.

Nor will the divide be fixed by other technical innovations. A digital switchover could provide better OTA broadcasting and more capacity, but that will not happen for years. New standards, such as ATSC 3.0 (Advanced Television Standards Committee 3.0), could diffuse as early as 2017. This new standard would improve the quality, spectrum efficiency, interactivity and mobile access, compared with current 1.0 standards, enabling a station like WKAR to broadcast content simultaneously receivable on phones, tablets, computers and home TV displays of standard, high definition and the ultra high def 4K video. ATSC 3.0 would be a ‘game changer’, but WKAR could not seize these opportunities if it lost this spectrum a year before they become active (Reid 2006). Moreover, the use of other platforms (e.g., Internet streaming, cable) comes with additional costs both for the content producer (should MSU continue to be) and the audience. An Internet provision of Lansing’s public television content would need huge funding to be competitive to viewers when TV remains the dominant media for news and entertainment. So again, with patterns of use still lagging far behind developments in new technology, is it too soon to cut off many in the community from over-the-air public broadcasting?

Thirdly, the spectrum was loaned to MSU for the purpose of providing public service broadcasting and information. All scenarios of this auction suggest that the funds received would be repurposed for other activities that might merit support on their own terms, but will not fulfill the public broadcasting purposes that formed the basis for MSU obtaining this spectrum. For example, the President of MSU suggested the proceeds could be placed into MSU’s endowment as a means to ensure its longevity, even though it is not a gift per se to the university (Simon 2015).

This is not a legal issue so much as one of public and community trust in the University fulfilling the spirit of public broadcasting or any other purpose for which money is given. The idea that the same content will be provided via other channels – meeting its obligation – is not plausible with the loss of PBS support and must carry status.

Finally, a number from the audience of the forum raised concerns over MSU losing a major platform for teaching. Many students are drawn to MSU to study broadcast production, and media production, generally. It is true that there are good universities, with strong schools of communication and media studies that do not have a public television studio and station. But why surrender one of MSU’s differentiating, strategic advantages in attracting and training its undergraduate students? It may be that more of a role in teaching could, and should, be made of WKAR’s presence at MSU, but auctioning off its OTA broadcast channel would undermine these opportunities.

In short, there are real issues revolving around the financial wisdom, public service obligations, the regional community, inequities, and educational opportunities tied to this decision. From my perspective, it is not simply an issue of either/or, but also of timing. I hope I am not seen as one of those so-called ‘naysayers’, to use Mark Bashore’s term in his interview with President Simon. Five to ten years from now, it is most likely that the spectrum will be far, far more valuable, and more people will be digitally connected, even if not online. Whether based on a matter of principle, or sound financial management, it might well be best to relinquish at this time.

So I am delighted that MSU is continuing to explore these issues. Perhaps there is good evidence to challenge each of these reservations I’ve outlined. In that spirit, I am looking forward to the second forum, and the potential to follow the Lansing case as a concrete, real world example of the opportunities, threats, and prospects for public broadcasting in the United States.

Bill Dutton
A personal perspective that does not necessarily represent the views of the Quello Center or any other organization.

References

CPB (2014), Corporation for Public Broadcasting, White Paper on Spectrum Auction and Repacking. 7 August. http://www.cpb.org/spectrum/reports/CPB-White-Paper-on-Spectrum-Auction-and-Repacking-Process.pdf?pdf=CPB-White-Paper

Dutton, William H. and Law, Ginette and Groselj, Darja and Hangler, Frank and Vidan, Gili and Cheng, Lin and Lu, Xiaobin and Zhi, Hui and Zhao, Qiyong and Wang, Bin, Mobile Communication Today and Tomorrow (December 4, 2014). A Quello Policy Research Paper, Quello Center, Michigan State University. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2534236 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2534236

Lawson, J. (2015), ‘Minority, public TV viewers face greatest threat in FCC auction’, 31 August: http://current.org/2015/08/minority-public-tv-viewers-face-greatest-threat-in-fcc-auction/

Reid, G. (2016), Comments at the MSU Forum, 4 January.

Simon, L.A. (2015), President Lou Anna Simon speaking on the future of WKAR-TV signal ‘to be determined in 2016’. Interview with Mark Bashore, 21 December 2015: http://wkar.org/post/pres-simon-future-wkar-tv-signal-be-determined-2016#stream/0

Wolcott, R.J. (2016), ‘Residents Concerned About Potential WKAR-TV Sale’, Lansing State Journal, January 5: 3A, 5A.

Notes

Tags: , , , , , , ,


Advisory Board Member John D. Evans Named to Cable Hall of Fame

by

The Quello Center congratulates our Advisory Board Member, John D. Evans, Chairman and CEO, Evans Telecommunications Co., on being honored by inclusion in the Cable Center’s Hall of Fame Class of 2016. The Cable Hall of Fame ‘recognizes those ground-breaking leaders who have shaped and advanced our industry. Induction into the Cable Hall of Fame is one of the industry’s highest and most exclusive honors.’

John D. Evans

John D. Evans

John was happy for me to share this news with the Advisory Board and friends and colleagues of the Quello Center, noting that ‘… Jim Quello for over 40 years (from when I was a sophomore at the University of Michigan) was my friend, my mentor and my guide. He often gave me the courage and advice to do the right thing. His integrity was his honesty, driven by courage, and tempered by truth.’

On the very day we received this news about John being honored, the College of Communication Arts and Sciences (ComArtsSci) at Michigan State University (MSU) happened to have a full meeting of its faculty and staff, which focused on discussion of the importance of a student’s experience while attending university. John’s story is a great example of the central importance of a student’s experience in higher education. He was a graduate of the University of Michigan – the ‘other university’, illustrating the reach of Jim Quello’s influence on so many of our Michigan institutions. MSU, U-M and all other centers of learning and education need to keep this in mind. Its wonderful when a student’s experience shapes a person’s future in such a clear and demonstrable fashion as in John’s case. In reflecting on James Quello’s influence on his career, John told me that ‘Jim Quello played such an important part in my life … I would not be where I am today had he not believed, nurtured and mentored me.’

The Quello Center is honored to have John Evans and other major figures from industry, government and academia on its Advisory Board. And we are delighted that the Quello Center continues to be a legacy of James and Mary Quello at MSU and hold out the potential for Jim Quello to continue shaping the experiences of students and faculty through the center named in his honor by his friends and colleagues.

John Evans & James Quello

John Evans & James Quello

The full Class of 2016 honors went to:

Mika Brzezinski and Joe Scarborough, MSNBC’s Morning Joe
Pat Esser, President, Cox Communications, Inc.
John D. Evans, Chairman and CEO, Evans Telecommunications Co.
Tom Rogers, President and CEO, TiVo Inc.
Robert J. Stanzione, Chairman and CEO, ARRIS
John O. “Dubby” Wynne, Retired President and CEO, Landmark

Notes

Quello Center Advisory Board: http://quello.msu.edu/people/advisory-board/

The Cable Center’s Hall of Fame http://cablecenter.org/cable-hall-of-fame.html

Mulichannel News: http://www.multichannel.com/news/cable-tv-conventions/cable-hall-fame-selects-class-2016/394434

Tags: , , , , , , , ,


Com Arts & Sciences at MSU Opens Search for 15 Academics

by

The Michigan State University College of Communication Arts & Sciences is seeking a large incoming cohort of new faculty members at all levels to fill 15 positions across the college. We seek intellectual leaders who will continue the progressive legacy of MSU in forging new pathways in communication science. We are excited to welcome new colleagues into a collegial, productive, and dynamic environment where collaboration is the norm and not the exception.

The nature of this hire provides a rare opportunity to bring a cluster of researchers focused on particular research problems in novel areas that we have identified in our college strategic plan, including computational science and neuroscience, as well as in existing areas of strength like communication technology and health, science communication , or environment and international communication. If you are interested in any of our MSU positions as an individual or as a group, please contact the search chair from the appropriate job announcement. See cas.msu.edu/places/cas-deans-office/jobs/ for contact information and position descriptions.

Com Arts & Sciences at MSU

Com Arts & Sciences at MSU

MSU understands that seeking, accepting, and maintaining employment often involves considerations about the career of a spouse or partner. MSU offers dual career assistance to the spouse or partner of candidates for faculty and academic staff positions. Please visit worklife.msu.edu/dual-career for further information. MSU is located at the center of a vibrant business corridor representing a total metropolitan statistical area population of 6.5 million people within average U.S. commute time.

MSU is an affirmative-action, equal opportunity employer. MSU is committed to achieving excellence through cultural diversity. The university actively encourages applications and/or nominations of women, persons of color, veterans and persons with disabilities.

Please forward a link to this post to anyone who you would recommend or who might be interested in joining MSU’s rich tradition of award-winning teaching, research, professional and creative work.

Thank you!

Tags: , , , , , ,


Memorial to Mark Levy: Past Chair and Professor of Media and Information and Quello Colleague

by

August 22nd, 2015

This video records a memorial event for Professor Mark Levy, which was held at the 2015 Meeting of the International Communication Association (ICA) in San Juan, Puerto Rico.

Mark Levy Memorial from Quello Center on Vimeo.

Mark served on the faculty of the College of Communication Arts & Sciences at MSU for more than 15 years. He joined MSU in 1999 to Chair the Department of Telecommunication and Information Studies (renamed as the Department of Media and Information) until 2006. The Mark Levy ICT4D Scholarship Fund has been set up to honor his legacy, since the role of the Internet in development was one of this latest foci as a faculty member of the department. To give to this fund, visit https://givingto.msu.edu/gift/?sid=1893.

Tags: , , , , , ,