68th ICA Conference in Prague—Voices

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Between 24-28 May, thousands of communication scholars from all over the world gathered for the 68th International Communication Association Conference in Prague, Czech Republic. The College of Communication Arts & Sciences had a particularly strong presence at the conference with more than 80 faculty and students presenting their research. The Quello Center’s Assistant Director Bibi Reisdorf and Research Fellow Laleah Fernandez were among those presentations with some of the results from the Quello Search Project.

Dr. Fernandez presenting about The Vulnerables at ICA 2018

As part of the large program, the team working on the Quello Search Project, Grant Blank (Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford), Elizabeth Dubois (Department of Communication, University of Ottawa), Bill Dutton, Laleah Fernandez, and Bibi Reisdorf, put together a panel on “Personalization, Politics, and Policy: Cross-National Perspectives”. Despite the early morning start (8am) on the day following all the big ICA receptions, a good crowd turned up to hear about our results pertaining to how people make use of a diverse range of media to find information on political matters. The papers presented in this panel ranged from a focus on personalization of search, to a critical discussion of algorithmic literacy, from exploring “the vulnerable” (i.e. those who have low search skills and little interest in politics) to discussing the policy implications of citizens’ complex media habits. The panel presentations were followed by a critical discussion of the presented results by Cornelius Puschmann, Hans Bredow Institute for Media Research.

Immediately after this early morning panel, Bibi Reisdorf also took part in a panel on “Filter Bubbles: From Academic Debate to Robust Empirical Analysis”, which she co-organized together with Anja Bechmann, Aarhus University, and Oscar Westlund, University of Gothenburg & Volda University College. This panel paid specific attention to empirical evidence of the extent (or lack thereof) of filter bubbles around the globe. Despite different foci and datasets, all four panelists, Anja Bechmann, Aarhus University, Axel Bruns, Queensland University of Technology, Neil Thurman, LM University Munich, and Quello’s Bibi Reisdorf, presented findings that supported results from our Quello Search Project, which showed that although filter bubbles and echo chambers do exist, the magnitude is largely overstated and the resulting panics are unnecessary and unhelpful. The results were discussed and responded to by MSU’s very own newest ICA Fellow, Prof. Esther Thorson, who pointed out that this type of research needs to be more closely investigated and critically evaluated in light of existing communication theories, such as Uses and Gratifications or Confirmation Bias, to name just a few.

Dr. Reisdorf presenting about Algorithmic Literacy at ICA 2018

Overall, the conference was a great success for the Quello team, who also participated in a pre-conference workshop on survey design and survey questions on internet use organized by Prof. Eszter Hargittai, University of Zurich. In addition, we took a few hours each to enjoy beautiful Prague and the amazing culinary treats, including, of course, the fantastic beer and wine that can be found in this beautiful region of Europe.

Now, back in East Lansing, the team is busy finishing up a few book chapters and journal articles that revolve around the issues that were discussed at the ICA conference. Our next big conference will be TPRC in Washington, DC in September, where Laleah Fernandez will present some of our exciting results from the Detroit Study.

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University Research: A Skeptical Perspective by A. Michael Noll

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UNIVERSITY RESEARCH: A SKEPTICAL PERSPECTIVE

A. Michael Noll

January 13, 2018

© Copyright 2017 AMN

University research has skeptically made little contribution to the striking advances in communications technology of the last 50 or so years. This is hardly surprising, since most of the advances came from R&D at industrial facilities. The skeptical perspective in this piece is based on my early experience at an industrial research laboratory, in government, and later at a university. My conclusion is that university research is essential mostly for the education and training of students, who then graduate and conduct meaningful research for industry.

Ivory Tower sciblog.co.nz

One important example of technological innovation in the communication area is communication satellites. But they were not the result of university research. Bell Labs pioneered satellite communications over a half century ago. In fact, science fiction writer Arthur C. Clarke, as early as 1945, first proposed communication satellites. The Soviets (Sputnik in 1957) developed the first satellite. Then Bell Telephone Laboratories (Echo in 1960 and Telstar in 1962) developed early communication satellites — none of this was university research.

Another technological innovation is the Internet. Was it solely the result of university research? The precursor of today’s Internet was the Arpanet, which utilized packet switching to avoid then costly data service. The Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) of the Federal defense department funded the development of the Arpanet, which was the brainchild of Dr. Larry Roberts, who directed the project at ARPA. Much of the actual development work was done at Bolt, Beranek, and Newman (BBN). Although university people were involved, the Arpanet was not solely the result of university research.

I am not familiar with chemical research and physics, and thus do not know how much practical research has occurred at university facilities. My expertise is in electrical engineering and telecommunications technology. Interesting university research has been done in astrophysics, but little relevance has occurred from this research – it deals with such topics as black holes and distances measured in millions on light years. Decades ago, John McCarthy at his laboratory at Stanford University, and the students he educated did exciting research in artificial intelligence and robotics.

The broader question is what is the purpose and mission of universities, and what is the role of university research? This can become the domain of self-serving opinion. It is a controversial topic with “muddy waters” on its importance depending on personal opinions and perspectives.

Sitting here at my desk with the computer on which I am writing this article, I think of the technology around me. The graphical interface on the computer was invented at the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center (PARC); the mouse was invented at the Stanford Research Institute; researchers at Bell Telephone Laboratories invented the Unix operating system. None of this was university research. Many innovations are the result of discoveries by many researchers at different organizations – credit frequently should be more collectively attributed.

The Federal government through a peer-review process sponsors much university research. The process in seeking support for peer-reviewed research is lengthy and elaborate. It sometimes appears that more thought and effort goes into writing the proposal than the actual conduct of the research. The peer review process assures that the research will be mostly mainstream.

Decades ago, when I worked in Washington and collaborated with the Office of Management and Budget, I wondered whether university research funded by the National Science Foundation was a form of welfare for academics. It was also a reason for being released from teaching a course or two — teaching is real work.

I wonder whether it would be simpler and would result in more innovative groundbreaking research if the university simply supported the research from its endowment and own funds. But these funds would need to be distributed evenly and might not be sufficient to support current levels of research. However, avoiding proposal writing might add efficiency.

University research frequently is more theoretical, not very practical, and long term. It usually is not the kind of proprietary research that leads to breakthroughs and pioneering innovations with practical industrial application. The mission of university research frequently is “new knowledge for its own sake,” as contrasted with industrial research that supports the mission of the industrial firm. It is not the mission of the university to make new products and provide new services.

The best research supports the mission of the sponsoring organization. The mission of a university is education – not providing telecommunication service, space craft, refrigerators, and so forth. Indeed, the major mission of the university should be education. If doctoral students are to be educated and trained, then they need the opportunity to perform some form of research. After they graduate, these doctorial students then frequently go to work at industry performing practical and relevant work. The career path for doctoral students that seems to be most applauded by the faculty is to graduate and work at another university, where their doctoral students then apply to yet another graduate program – not for industry or on practical problems. “Practical” and “relevant” seem to be characterizations to be avoided at many universities.

Research usually tackled practical problems in support of a real-world mission of the sponsor. A good way for a university to be involved in such research is through a separate for-profit research unit. The researchers would not teach nor be tenured – they would be employees. Patents would be obtained, along with other intellectual property. Students and faculty could also work part-time at the research facility. The management of the research unit would evaluate the research. An issue with university research is that the departmental administration does not evaluate it and instead relies on outside peer review.

The “product” of universities is its graduates. Research universities educate and train doctoral students. As graduates these newly minted doctorates go to work in industry performing propriety industrial research and devolvement. The results of this R&D makes their way back to the university, affecting and refining the topics of research done by faculty and current doctoral students. This is a tight loop.

I have taken a skeptical and controversial tone in this piece. But in the end, what should matter is meaningful research that solves real problems or leads to new knowledge and innovations — not where it is performed. Research should make our lives better through new products and services.

A. Michael Noll

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Myths of Detroit Internet Use

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The Quello Center recently completed a study focused on Internet use in Detroit, Michigan. The findings may surprise anyone who believes that Detroiters are under-connected, go online primarily for entertainment or are uninterested in the Internet.

The study surveyed three Detroit neighborhoods, Cody-Rouge, Milwaukee Junction and 7/8 Mile and Woodward. Focus groups were also conducted with community stakeholders, adult residents and youth.  The results are based on a sample of 525 Detroit residents who responded to our telephone survey and nearly 30 residents who participated in focus groups.

Myth #1: Detroiters are under-connected

Our study found that even among those who do not have home access, Detroiters overwhelming find a way to get online. Like other studies, our study found that only about 60 percent of Detroit households have a contract with an Internet Service Provider in their home, however, that statistic alone is misleading. When asked if they have home Internet access, about 78 percent say yes. This suggests that most find a way to access the Internet at home with or without an ISP. Even more people are online when they are traversing around the city.

Myth #2: Detroiters go online primarily for entertainment

Once online, Detroiters are doing work or involved in information seeking tasks – dispelling another misperception of Internet use in Detroit. Across all of our focus groups participants report using the Internet “every day and everywhere.” When asked what they do online, the number one activity reported in the survey was checking email, followed by getting information on local events, reading the news and searching for health information. Comparatively the least reported activities included getting information on sports, streaming videos and posting photos. In other words, Detroiters use the Internet for a variety of purposes, the least of which is entertainment.

 

Myth #3: Detroiters are not interested in home Internet access

Among the participants in this study, Detroiters say they are very well aware of the benefits of Internet access. Most use the Internet regularly. Most have very positive attitudes toward the Internet, especially when compared to any stated fears. While most are regularly online and use the Internet at home, 60 percent of those who do not have home access say they would like it.

Still, access gaps and digital divides remain. These gaps and divides are more subtle than simply using or accessing the Internet. These gaps and divides manifest in the form of dependence on mobile phones, and the limitations of mobile devices when compared to, or used in combination with, home devices like desktops and laptops. Not all content is mobile friendly. Job and scholarship applications cannot be completed on mobile phones. Homework and work related spreadsheets and documents are limited, difficult or impossible to complete on a mobile phone. Creativity is stifled by the limitations of a mobile phone. In order to address these gaps, Detroiters need to recognize these limitation, and have access to home devices, particularly laptops and software to sustain work, homework and creative endeavors.

It is also worth noting that those who do have home access are paying a disproportionate amount of their income for an ISP. For example, in our survey the average household is paying $50 a month. At the same time, the average household income in Detroit is $26,000 a year, and 75 percent of our sample say their household income is average or below average (nearly 50 percent of the sample say their household makes below or far below $26,000 a year).  To put this in perspective, focus group participants admitted to delaying, avoiding or canceling other important services and necessities in order to continue to pay for home Internet or cell phone bills to use the Internet. Parents say they do it for their children. Working adults say they do it to stay competitive. Those seeking employment say they do it search for jobs and to receive calls if an opportunity becomes available. In other words, Detroiters are very well aware of the value of accessing the Internet and most are doing whatever it takes get online.

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Fake News and Filter Bubbles: The Quello Search Project

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Bill Dutton will present the findings of the Quello Search Project to kick off a workshop on fake news and filter bubbles at Bruegel, a European think tank, specializing in economics, that is based in Brussels. Background on the Quello Search Project can be found in the initial report of the project, Search and Politics: The Uses and Impacts of Search in Britain, France, Germany, Italy, Poland, Spain, and the United States. A short blog about the thrust of our findings is also online, entitled “Fake News, Echo Chambers and Filter Bubbles: Underresearched and Overhyped“.

Brussels

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Keith N. Hampton Elected to Sociological Research Association

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Our Quello Research Fellow, Professor Keith N. Hampton, a Professor in the Department of Media & Information in MSU’s College of Communication Arts & Sciences, has received a prestigious award from the Sociological Research Association (SRA) in being elected as a new member. The SRA is an honor society that elects up to only 14 new members a year, based on their excellence in research. As the officers of SRA noted: “SRA election signifies the esteem of your colleagues in the profession and their enthusiasm for your scholarship.”

Prof Keith Hampton

Professor Hampton joined MSU last year and has already been incredibly active in developing new grant proposals, and continuing his stream of academic publications around use of the Internet in shaping many dimensions of community. He is presently involved with the Quello Center’s research on digital divides and social capital in Detroit, and an ambitious proposal on the future of the Internet and community enabled by next generation broadcast standards.

Our congratulations and thanks to Keith for enhancing the stature of the Center, Department, and College of Communication Arts & Sciences at MSU. It goes without saying that his colleagues share the SRA’s enthusiasm for his scholarship, and particularly his presence and impact on our students, faculty and many colleagues.

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Flashing Lights Save Birds: Thoughts on a Talk by Joelle Gehring

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Joelle Gehring, PhD, a biologist for the FCC, works with communications tower operators to minimize bird collisions with towers, which are so serious that they are posing risks to endangered migratory birds. Dr Gehring noted that current estimates are that “6.8 million birds … collide with U.S. and Canadian communication towers during migration.

Joelle described the development of her research aimed at identifying what features of communications towers are leading to so many birds colliding with and being killed by collisions with these towers. The title of her talk was ‘Reducing Avian Collisions with Communications Towers: From Research to Implementation’. Living in Michigan, and studying wildlife ecology at Purdue University, she latched onto the problem of bird deaths being caused by them colliding with the towers. Her study looked systematically at such factors as the weather, the location of towers in the surrounding landscape, the tower support system (guide wires), the heights of the towers, and the tower lighting systems. Height makes a difference with broadcast towers being among the tallest and projecting into the flight paths of migratory birds. But whether the towers had lights that were constantly on or blinking turned out to be a surprising and important finding. Simply by ensuring that towers switched to blinking, flashing lights, created a far more bird friendly lighting system – saving tens of thousands of birds over time.

Dr Gehring’s research is one of the best examples of a clear and insightful project having major policy implications. Hers is research with a clear and major impact on migratory birds.

Joelle Gehring at MSU 2017

Joelle Flyer

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Christine L. Borgman’s Quello Lecture on Data Sharing

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Christine L. Borgman’s Quello Lecture on ‘Motivations for Sharing and Reusing Data:
Complexities and Contradictions in the Use of a Digital Data Archive’ presented for the Quello Center, Michigan State University, on October 5, 2016. The talk draws on her research with DANS, the Data Archiving and Networked Services of the Netherlands, and the UCLA Center for Knowledge Infrastructures.

Christine L. Borgman – Motivations for Sharing and Reusing Data from Quello Center on Vimeo.

Abstract

Researchers face competing challenges for access to their data. One is the pressure to make their data open in response to mandates from funding agencies, journals, and science policy makers. Second is the lack of resources – human, technical, economic, and institutional – to make their data open. Third is that good reasons exist to maintain control of their data, whether to protect the confidentiality of human subjects, to gain competitive advantage over other researchers, or the sheer difficulty of extracting data from the contexts in which they originated. Researchers are encouraged – or required – to contribute their data to archives, yet surprisingly little is known about the uses and users of digital data archives, about relationships between users and the staff of data archives, or how these behaviors vary by discipline, geographic region, policy, and other factors. Digital data archives are not a single type of institution, however. They vary widely in organizational structure, mission, collection, funding, and relationships to their users and other stakeholders. This talk draws upon an exploratory study of DANS, the Data Archiving and Networked Services of the Netherlands. We mined transaction logs to draw samples of contributors to DANS and consumers of DANS data (Borgman, Scharnhorst, Van den Berg, Van de Sompel, & Treloar, 2015) and then conducted interviews with DANS archivists, contributors, and consumers to examine who contributes data to DANS and why, who consumes data from DANS and why, and what roles archivists play in acquiring and disseminating data. Early findings suggest that motivations are complex, varied, and often contradictory, and that the uses and users of DANS are far more diverse than anticipated. Implications of these findings, which draw upon the premises of the presenter’s recent book Big Data, Little Data, No Data: Scholarship in the Networked World (2015), raise concerns for stakeholders in research data such as scholars, students, librarians, funding agencies, policy makers, publishers, and the public.

Borgman, C. L. (2015). Big Data, Little Data, No Data: Scholarship in the Networked World. Cambridge MA: MIT Press.

Borgman, C. L., Scharnhorst, A., Van den Berg, H., Van de Sompel, H., & Treloar, A. (2015). Who uses the digital data archive? An exploratory study of DANS. Presented at the Association for Information Science and Technology, St Louis, MO: Information Today.

Biographical Sketch

Christine L. Borgman, Distinguished Professor and Presidential Chair in Information Studies at UCLA, is the author of more than 250 publications in information studies, computer science, and communication. These include three books from MIT Press: Big Data, Little Data, No Data: Scholarship in the Networked World (2015), winner of the 2015 American Publishers Award for Professional and Scholarly Excellence (PROSE Award) in Computing and Information Sciences; Scholarship in the Digital Age: Information, Infrastructure, and the Internet (2007); and From Gutenberg to the Global Information Infrastructure: Access to Information in a Networked World (2000). The latter two books won the Best Information Science Book of the Year award from the Association for Information Science and Technology (ASIST). Professor Borgman is Chair of the Committee to Visit the Harvard Library and Co-Chair of the CODATA-ICSTI Task Group on Data Citation and Attribution. She is a member of the Library of Congress Scholars Council; the Board of Directors of the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC); the Council of the Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICSPR); the CLARIAH International Advisory Panel; the advisory board to Authorea; and is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and of the Association for Computing Machinery. At UCLA, she directs the Center for Knowledge Infrastructures with funding from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation and other sources.

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Quello Postdoctoral Research Associate Position Open

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Quello Postdoctoral Research Associate Position at Michigan State University Posting #4068

William Dutton, the Quello Professor of Media and Information Policy and Director of the Quello Center in the Department of Media and Information at Michigan State University (MSU), is seeking to hire a Postdoctoral Fellow as a Research Associate for a 1 year position, with the potential for renewal. The position is available beginning as soon as January 2017. The research associate will work with Professor Dutton and additional Quello research staff members on existing Quello research projects and in developing proposals for further research. Projects focus on media, information and Internet policy, regulation and governance, such as the Center’s studies on the impact of network neutrality, digital inequalities, access to broadband, and the social dynamics of Internet search. More information is on the Center’s website at: http://quello.msu.edu/

Candidates should explain the relevance of their background and interests to the work of the Quello Center. The appointment would enable candidates to pursue their own research as well as supporting ongoing work at the Center, with the potential for developing new projects and support for continuation beyond the first year. th

Applicants must have defended their dissertation prior to beginning the postdoctoral fellowship. A doctoral degree in Political Science, Law, Policy, Economics, Sociology, Psychology, Communication, New Media, Internet Studies, Information Studies, or a related field is required. Candidates must have (1) strong methodological training and skills of relevance to policy research, (2) experience writing grant and funding proposals, and (3) good organizational and time management skills. The quality of prior work, such as publications, and grant writing experience will be key in evaluating all applications. Particular consideration will be given to candidates that show evidence of having strong empirical skills, including an understanding of various methodologies pertaining to large datasets and computational data analysis, such as social network analysis.

The Research Associate position is a 12 month, full-time appointment, with salary up to $45,000 depending upon qualifications. Benefits are also provided. See http://grad.msu.edu/pdo/ and http://www.hr.msu.edu/benefits/ for more information on postdoctoral training and benefits at MSU.
Materials should be submitted via the MSU online system:
– Cover letter describing why you are interested in this position, and what training, skills, research and methodological background you would bring to the work of the Quello Center and this position.
– Names and contact information for three references
– An up-to-date curriculum vitae
– One sample of your best work

Review of applications will begin immediately and continue until a suitable candidate is selected. You may view the job description and apply online at referring to posting number #4068

Notes:
– Information about the Quello Center: http://quello.msu.edu
– The Department of Media and Information is home to a dynamic, interdisciplinary faculty internationally regarded for their research on the uses and implications of information and communication technologies, such as the Internet and related social and mobile media. Our curricula address both the theoretical and practical aspects of media use and production, and our alumni have achieved positions of prominence in academia, industry, and government.
– MSU is an affirmative-action, equal opportunity employer. MSU is committed to achieving excellence through cultural diversity. The university actively encourages applications and/or nominations of women, persons of color, veterans and persons with disabilities.

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A New Year at the Quello Center: Research, Research, Research

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With the start of a new academic year, the Quello Center is progressing on many fronts, but particularly in the development of new research. Given awards for two recent projects, one on wireless access for the last mile, and another on the role of search in shaping political opinions, based on cross-national comparative research in North America and Europe, our set of projects continues to grow. It is wonderful to see our team so fully occupied with research projects and proposals.

This has been possible through the hard work and creative ideas of our core research team, all of who remain in place for the coming year. These researchers include:

Dr Bianca Reisdorf, first hired as a Quello postdoctoral researcher last year, has been promoted to Assistant Director of the Quello Center, and Assistant Professor in the Department of Media and Information. Bianca began research on digital inequalities while a DPhil student at the OII at the University of Oxford, and is continuing this stream of research here at the Quello Center in work on digital divides in Michigan and across the US, as well as on our survey components of our comparative study of the use of Internet search in politics.

Research Team Members R.V. Rikard, Bibi Reisdorf, Mitch Shapiro, Aleks Yankelevich

Research Team Members R.V. Rikard, Bibi Reisdorf, Mitch Shapiro, Aleks Yankelevich

Dr Aleksandr Yankelevich, our Research Assistant Professor, who joined the Quello Center after four years at the FCC, which won him the FCC’s Excellence in Economic Analysis Award. He is leading research on wireless innovation for last mile access (WILMA), where he is focused on analysis of the use of spectrum for the last mile, and the policy are regulatory constraints they entail. And he has developed a proposal with Professor Johannes Bauer to deepen our research on the actual impacts of network neutrality, focusing on investment patterns within the communication industry.

Mitch Shapiro, is a Quello researcher, currently focused on the WILMA project, undertaking case studies of initiatives at providing last mile access across the US. He brings to the Quello Center his extensive experience working as a consultant for academic institutions, such as Harvard’s Berkman Center, and industry, such as with Strategic Networks Group and Pulse Broadband; Pike & Fischer, a unit of the Bureau of National Affairs (now Bloomberg BNA); Pangrac & Associates, Probe Reseach and Paul Kagan Associates.

Based on the accomplishments of this core team over the past year, we have been able to open a new position for a post-doctoral researcher that we will be advertising shortly. In addition, we have been able to complement this team with part-time researchers based in Detroit, who are helping with interviews of a sample of over 1,300 nonprofit organizations working to support the development of a city that some have called the New Berlin. Our interviews are shedding light on the role of the Internet and social media in the activities of organizations so embedded in interpersonal networks across the city.

So the new academic year is promising more research to build on the strength of our last year. If you are asking ‘What is all this research about?’ the answer is to inform and stimulate debate on media and information policy and practice in our digital age.

Follow us and join our seminars and lectures as time permits.

Bill Dutton

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Videos from Quello Center Talks and Visitors

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Quello Center Video Catalog

The following Quello Center videos, listed within general categories, are available free online through the designated links. The Quello Center hopes they will help support your research and teaching. Please post any comments you may have on this blog. We welcome your thoughts, and hope you enjoy whatever video presentations are of interest to your work.

Take your pick,

Bill Dutton, Director of the Quello Center

Videos

Big Data

Use of Big Data By States: China & India
By Muzammil Hussain

Cable and Satellite

Comparing Cable TV in Korea and the USA: Major Differences
By Sung Wook Ji

Communication, Media and Information Policy

Communication in the Modern Age
Interview with Bill Dutton and Dr. Sung Hee Kim

Communication Policy Processes in the US
By Johannes Bauer

Regulating the Internet: What is ‘Special Access’ and Why is it so Important?
By Aleks Yankelevich

Delivering Media Content in a New Technological Environment: An Explanation of Policy Implications
By Steve Wildman

Cybersecurity and Cybercrime

Cybercrime Offending and Victimization
By Tom Holt

Digital Inequalities

Center For Digital Inclusion
By Jon Gant

Unlocking Potential: New Frontiers in Digital Inequality Research
By Bibi Reisdorf

Economic Development

Social Media & Development
Rob Ackland

ICT For Development in Agricultural Sectors
With Charles Steinfield

Internet Policy, Regulation and Governance

The Destabilization of Internet Governance
By Laura DeNardis

Trashed: A Comparative Exploration of Law’s Relevance to Online Reputation
By Elizabeth Kirley

Racism, Sexism, and Video Games: Social Justice Campaigns and the Struggle for Gamer Identity
By Lisa Nakamura

Anatomy of the FCC’s Network Neutrality Rules (Webcast)
By Adam Candeub

Domination in Search Markets: Why? How? & How to Respond?
By Steve Wildman

Regulating the Internet: What is ‘Special Access’ and Why is it so Important?
By Aleks Yankelevich

Management

The Importance of Public Service #ChangeAgents in Exponential Times
By David Bray
Talk – https://vimeo.com/140513826
Discussion – https://vimeo.com/140513867

Internet, Open Data, and Civic Engagement in Detroit
By Garlin Gilchrist II

Enterprise Social Media: Implications for Business Collaboration and Knowledge Management
By Charles Steinfield

New Business Models for New Media
By Dr. Constantinos K. Coursaris

Public Service

Millennials, Public Media and The Future of Civil Discourse
By Alexander Heffner

Internet, Open Data, and Civic Engagement in Detroit
By Garlin Gilchrist II

Use of Big Data By States: China & India
By Muzammil Hussain

Social Media and Society

Crowdsourced and Community Maintained
By Caroline Haythornthwaite

Trashed: A Comparative Exploration of Law’s Relevance to Online Reputation
By Elizabeth Kirley

Racism, Sexism, and Video Games: Social Justice Campaigns and the Struggle for Gamer Identity
By Lisa Nakamura

I Change My City – Through the Internet
By Venkatesh Kannaiah

I Paid a Bribe
By Venkatesh Kannaiah

Society Meets Social Media: Canaries at the Coal Face of the Internet
By William Dutton
Watch video

Food Safety in Online Issue Networks
By Annie Waldherr

Comprehension Models in Text and Audiovisual Processing
By Dave Ewoldsen

Telecommunication and the Internet in Community and Urban Development

I Change My City – Through the Internet
By Venkatesh Kannaiah

Internet, Open Data, and Civic Engagement in Detroit
By Garlin Gilchrist II

Persistent and Pervasive Community
By Keith Hampton

Communication Technology and Urban Community: Stories From Seoul
By Yong-Chan Kim

Tributes, Awards, Memorials

Cable Hall of Fame 2016 Recognition of John Evans
By John Evans

Tribute to Steve Wildman on his Retirement
By Professors Johannes Bauer & Prabu David

Tribute to Quello Center Founding Director, Steve Wildman
Created by Gary Reid & WKAR

Memorial to Mark Levy: Past Chair and Professor of Media and Information and Quello Colleague

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