Discussion of The Importance of Public Service #ChangeAgents

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Following David A. Bray’s 21 September 2015 Quello Lecture on ‘The Importance of Public Service #ChangeAgents in Exponential Times’, David led a wide ranging discussion, available in this Webcast.

David Bray – The Importance of Public Service #ChangeAgents in Exponential Times – Discussion from Quello Center on Vimeo.

Abstract

Technology is rapidly changing our world, the 7 billion networked devices 
in 2013 will double 14 billion in 2015 to anywhere between 50 to 200 billion in 2020. The ability to work and collaborate securely anywhere, anytime, on any device will reshape public service. We must ensure security and privacy are baked-in at code development level, testing
from ground up and automating alerts. Legal code and digital code must work together, enabling more inclusive work across government workers, citizen-led contributions, and public private partnerships. All together, these actions will transform Public Service to truly be “We the (Mobile, Data-Enabled, Collaborative) People” working to improve our world.

Dr. David A. Bray is a 2015 Eisenhower Fellow, Visiting Associate on Cyber Security with the University of Oxford, and Chief Information Officer for the Federal Communications Commission.

He began working for the U.S. government at age 15 on computer simulations at a Department of Energy facility. In later roles he designed new telemedicine interfaces and space-based forest fire forecasting prototypes for the Department of Defense. From 1998-2000 he volunteered as an occasional crew lead with Habitat for Humanity International in the Philippines, Honduras, Romania, and Nepal while also working as a project manager with Yahoo! and a Microsoft partner firm. He then joined as IT Chief for the Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Program at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, leading the program’s technology response to during 9/11, anthrax in 2001, Severe Acute Respiratory System in 2003, and other international public health emergencies. He later completed a PhD in Information Systems from Emory University and two post-doctoral associateships at MIT and Harvard in 2008.

In 2009, Dr. Bray volunteered to deploy to Afghanistan to help “think differently” on military and humanitarian issues and in 2010 became a Senior National Intelligence Service Executive advocating for increased information interoperability, cybersecurity, and protection of civil liberties. In 2012, Dr. Bray became the Executive Director for the bipartisan National Commission for Review of Research and Development Programs of the United States Intelligence Community, later receiving the National Intelligence Exceptional Achievement Medal. He received both the Arthur S. Flemming Award and Roger W. Jones Award for Executive Leadership in 2013. He also was chosen to be an Eisenhower Fellow to meet with leaders in Taiwan and Australia on multisector cyber strategies for the “Internet of Everything” in 2015.

Dr. Bray has served as the Chief Information Officer for the Federal Communications Commission, leading FCC’s IT Transformation since 2013. He was selected to serve as a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and as a Visiting Associate for the Cybersecurity Working Group on Culture at the University of Oxford in 2014. He also has been named one of the “Fed 100” for 2015 and the “Most Social CIO” globally for 2015, tweeting as @fcc_cio.

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Memorial to Mark Levy: Past Chair and Professor of Media and Information and Quello Colleague

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August 22nd, 2015

This video records a memorial event for Professor Mark Levy, which was held at the 2015 Meeting of the International Communication Association (ICA) in San Juan, Puerto Rico.

Mark Levy Memorial from Quello Center on Vimeo.

Mark served on the faculty of the College of Communication Arts & Sciences at MSU for more than 15 years. He joined MSU in 1999 to Chair the Department of Telecommunication and Information Studies (renamed as the Department of Media and Information) until 2006. The Mark Levy ICT4D Scholarship Fund has been set up to honor his legacy, since the role of the Internet in development was one of this latest foci as a faculty member of the department. To give to this fund, visit https://givingto.msu.edu/gift/?sid=1893.

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I Change My City – through the Internet: Venkatesh Kannaiah on Ichangemycity.com

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I Change My City is a Web site ichangemycity.com that enables residents to report problems, from streets in need of repair to trash pickups, and more. In addition to identifying the problems, the system enables the public to determine if and when something has been done to address the problem.

In this video, Venkatesh Kannaiah, a senior editor for Ichnagemycity.com provides a clear overview of how this site operates and plays a role in addressing urban problems in cities across India, and worldwide, such as through similar Web-based platforms.

Venkatesh Kannaiah is a senior editor from India with wide-ranging experience working at news agencies, print outlets and online publications. He was a Knight International Journalism Fellow for India working to build networks of journalists and ‘right to information’ activists in south India. He has headed editorial teams at Sify.com, AOL India, MSN India and is now working as Head of Content for Ipaidabribe.com and Ichangemycity.com – part of a non-profit, Janaagraha Centre for Citizenship and Democracy, based out of Bangalore.

You can watch the video of part of his 20 July 2015 seminar at the Quello Center that dealt with Ichangemycity.com at:

Venkatesh Kannaiah – I Change My City from Quello Center on Vimeo.

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Paid a Bribe? Venkatesh Kannaiah’s Quello Seminar on Ipaidabribe.com

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Ipaidabribe.com was an innovator in the development of bribery websites that enable individuals to report bribery in ways that can be used to create information at the level of specific offenders but also aggregated information to identify the kinds of services and regions of a nation that are most plagued by corruption in the form of bribery. Bill Dutton has used this web site as an example of the potential of the Internet to support a ‘Fifth Estate’.

In this video, Venkatesh Kannaiah, a senior editor for Ipaidabribe.com provides a clear overview of how this site operates and plays a role in increasing accountability for corruption across India. and particularly in Bangalore, where the site is based. Venkatesh Kannaiah is a senior editor from India with wide-ranging experience working at news agencies, print outlets and online publications. He was a Knight International Journalism Fellow for India working to build networks of journalists and ‘right to information’ activists in south India. He has headed editorial teams at Sify.com, AOL India, MSN India and is now working as Head of Content for Ipaidabribe.com and Ichangemycity.com – part of a non-profit, Janaagraha, based out of Bangalore, the Janaagraha Centre for Citizenship & Democracy.

You can watch the video of his 20 July 2015 seminar at:

Venkatesh Kannaiah – I Paid a Bribe from Quello Center on Vimeo.

Your comments are welcomed.

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Society Meets Social Media: Canaries at the Coal Face of the Internet

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Bill Dutton gave a keynote presentation for Social Media & Society 2015, an international conference held 27-29 July 2015 at the Rogers School of Management at Reyerson University, Toronto, Canada. An abstract, and links to the powerpoint and video of the talk are posted here.

Abstract

Legal and regulatory initiatives shaped by moral panics over social media are a microcosm of many general threats to the vitality of a free, open and global Internet. The belief is widespread that social media and related Internet developments are unstoppable and beyond the control of governments and regulators across the world. However, initiatives afoot to address increasingly vocal public support for ‘doing something’ about concerns ranging from cyber-bullying to privacy, are pushing politicians and regulators to bring traditional approaches to media regulation to bear on social media and the Internet. These initiatives are unlikely to accomplish their intended aims but could well undermine the vitality of social media and the larger ecology of the Internet. Several types of response are critical. First, academics and practionners need to come forward with a regulatory model that is purpose built for social media and related applications of the Internet. Secondly, educational efforts need to be prioritized to help children and others learn how to use social media in more ethical, safe and effective ways. Thirdly, social media need to be designed in ways that enable users to hold other users more socially accountable for their actions.

Slides for the Talk are on Slideshare at: http://www.slideshare.net/WHDutton/society-meets-social-media-at-reyerson2015

Video of the Talk: https://ryecast.ryerson.ca/12/watch/9167.aspx

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Anatomy of the FCC’s Network Neutrality Rules, a Webcast by Adam Candeub

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This Webcast is from a Quello Center seminar conducted by Adam Candeub, MSU Law Faculty and Co-Principal Investigator of the Network Neutrality Impact Study. Professor Candeub provides his preliminary views on the details of the FCC’s network neutrality rules. The title of the seminar was Anatomy of the FCC’s Network Neutrality Rules, by Adam Candeub @ Quello Center, which was held on 18 May 2015.

Protecting and Promoting an Open Internet by Adam Candeub from Quello Center on Vimeo.

The FCC approved Chairman Tom Wheeler’s network neutrality proposal on 26 February 2015. The 3-2 vote for approval has been called a ‘watershed victory for activists’ in support of an open Internet, but criticized by others as a risk to the vitality of the Internet. Whether you are a proponent, opponent or observer of the net neutrality concept, it is useful to have an understanding of the actual ruling. In early April, the FCC sent the proposed rules to the Federal Register for publication, expected in June.

Our law colleague, Professor Adam Candeub, had been reading through the rules and offered to share his thoughts and interpretations of the ruling at a Quello Center Seminar for the Net Neutrality Impact Study.

Biographical Sketch

Adam Candeub is Professor, and Director of the Intellectual Property, Information & Communications Law Program, at Michigan State University College of Law, which he joined in 2004, and Director of the Intellectual Property and Communications Law program at MSU. He is a key resource for the Quello Center in areas of media law and policy. He was an attorney-advisor for the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in the Media Bureau and previously in the Common Carrier Bureau, Competitive Pricing Division. His work at the FCC involved him in critical decisions in communications law. From 1998 to 2000, Professor Candeub was a litigation associate for the Washington D.C. firm of Jones, Day, Reavis & Pogue, in the issues and appeals practice. He also has served as a corporate associate with Cleary, Gottlieb, Steen & Hamilton, also in Washington, D.C. Immediately following law school, he clerked for Chief Judge J. Clifford Wallace, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. While in law school, Professor Candeub was an articles editor for the University of Pennsylvania Law Review. He is well published in numerous law reviews. Professor Candeub’s scholarly interests focus on the intersection of regulation, economics, and communications law and policy.

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Domination in Search Markets: Why? How? & How to Respond? by Steve Wildman

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This is Professor Steve Wildman’s leaving lecture entitled ‘Domination in Search Markets: Why? How? and How to Respond?’. The lecture was given on 20 April 2015 at the Communication Arts and Sciences Building at Michigan State University.

Domination in Search Markets by Steve Wildman from Quello Center on Vimeo.

Abstract

With rare exceptions, national markets for Internet search services are dominated by a single company, in most cases Google. Factors contributing to highly concentrated national search markets have been vigorously debated. In this talk I present findings from research projects with two sets of collaborators. Results from an econometric study of Yahoo’s local search service with W. Wayne Fu and Carol Ting suggest that positive two-way feedback between the number of consumer searchers using a search engine and the number of advertisers purchasing paid placements on its search results page is of sufficient magnitude that an initial advantage for one search service in either paid ads or consumer traffic could be amplified over time to become a nearly insurmountable barrier to competitors trying to displace it. The second study with Adam Candeub suggests that strategic selection of other internet services to bundle with a search service can contribute to substantial lock-in of a search service’s customers. The implications of both studies for policy design are also discussed. Steve was introduced by the Chair of Media and Information, Professor Johannes Bauer, and the lecture concluded with closing remarks by the Dean of Communication Arts & Sciences, Professor Prabu David.

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Tributes to Steve Wildman by Professors Johannes Bauer and Prabu David, Dean of Communication Arts & Sciences

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On 20 April 2015, Professor Steve Wildman gave his leaving lecture, marking his departure from MSU’s Department of Media and Information, where he was Founding Director of the Quello Center (1999-2014). His lecture was preceded and concluded by tributes, first from the Department Chair, Professor Johannes Bauer, and in conclusion, by the new Dean of the College of Communication Arts & Sciences, Professor Prabu David. This video features these tributes along with Professor Wildman’s thanks to many of his current and former Quello and MSU colleagues, including Johannes Bauer, Jim Spaniolo, the former Dean of Communication Arts & Sciences, when Steve was recruited, and Steve Lacy, Chip Steinfield, Bob Larose, Tom Baldwin, Tom Muth, Mark Levy, Gary Reid, Valeta Wensloff, Barbara Cherry, and his graduate students as well as to Bill Dutton for taking on the role as Quello Director and ‘bugging’ Steve to get on Twitter (with some success).

Tribute to Steve Wildman Final from Quello Center on Vimeo.

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Tribute to Quello Center Founding Director, Professor Steve Wildman

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Gary Reid and his colleagues at WKAR put together a wonderful video montage for a tribute to Professor Steve Wildman, Founding Director of the Quello Center, which was shown last week at a celebration of this career with other retiring faculty. It is short, entertaining and puts Steve’s career at MSU in the context of the Quello Center.

Steve Wildman Tribute Video – Founding Director of the Quello Center from Quello Center on Vimeo.

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Alexander Heffner on ‘Millennials, Public Media and The Future of Civil Discourse’

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Alexander Heffner delivered an engaging Quello Center Lecture on the engagement of ‘millennials’ in public media, issues and discourse. You are welcome to view the lecture, delivered on 18 March 2015, by going to the video below.

Quello Lecture and Panel on ‘Millennials, Public Media and The Future of Civil Discourse’ by Alexander Heffner (NEW) from Quello Center on Vimeo.

Alexander is seeking, through his work on ‘Open Minds’, a way to foster a more ‘civic-minded journalism culture, non-adversarial broadcasting in the public interest, and critical exploration of prosocial ideas.’ His talk can be viewed here, along with responses from two colleagues at MSU follow his talk, Eric Freedman, a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist at MSU, and Gary Reid, the Director of WKAR in East Lansing, Michigan. The responses and discussion challenge the concept of ‘millennials’, what is ‘newsworthy’ v ‘viral’ and what the key issues are in the future of public discourse – changing audiences, business models, the role of the journalist, and the quality of discourse. Optimists and pessimists about the future of public discourse can be found in the discussion.

Alexander is a graduate of Andover and Harvard, is host of The Open Mind on PBS Channel THIRTEEN/WNET and CUNY TV. Eric Freedman is the Knight Chair in environmental journalism and director of Capital News Service at MSU’s School of Journalism. Before joining the faculty full-time in 1996, Freedman was a reporter. Gary Reid is the Director of Broadcasting and General Manager of WDBM-FM, WKAR-AM/FM/TV. He is a University Distinguished Senior Specialist in the Department of Media and Information at MSU and an Associate Director of the Quello Center.

Alexander’s lecture is about 25 minutes, including my introduction, with two short responses, and discussion. We’d welcome any comments or feedback on this talk here on the Quello Center blog.

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