The Internet, Open Data, and Civic Engagement in Detroit: Video of Quello Seminar

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This video presents a talk by Garlin Gilchrist, the Deputy Technology Director for Civic Engagement in Detroit, with Kat Hartman, and Professor Marc Kruman responding. The presentation is about 20 minutes, followed the responses and about 15 minutes of discussion.

Quello Center Seminar on the Internet and Civic Engagement in Detroit from Quello Center on Vimeo.

Garlin focused on the launch of Detroit’s Open Data initiative, and the work of his office on the role of the Internet and related information and communication technologies in supporting civic and community engagement. He discusses initiatives the City of Detroit has been fostering, as well as other ongoing special projects emerging from groups and institutions working on the revitalization of Detroit. Finally, he underscored areas that could benefit from further research by universities, and other academic institutions.

Prior to his appointment in Detroit, Garlin most recently served as the National Campaign Director at MoveOn.org, where he focused on mobilizing MoveOn’s seven million members on issues of civil rights, education, and technology policy advocacy through community organizing and online action. Gilchrist also founded Detroit Diaspora, a network for native Detroiters living elsewhere to connect with one another as well as people doing positive work in the City of Detroit. He was also the former Director of New Media at the Center for Community Change, where he build a base of online supporters to advocate for public policies in the interests of low-income people, especially low-income people of color, and reflect strong community values in ways that ensure that their authentic voices are heard, amplified, and respected. More information about Garlin Gilchrist is available at: garlin.org/about-garlin-gilchrist-ii.html

Our first respondent, Kat Hartman, is a Detroit-based freelance writer, data analyst, and information designer with data visualization firm, NiJeL. She received her MFA from the Stamps School of Art + Design at the University of Michigan and enjoys finding the intersections between design and research. She has worked as a data analyst at multiple non-profit organizations including Data Driven Detroit, a National Neighborhood Indicators Partner (NNIP) with the Urban Institute. She has also designed illustrated health materials for UNICEF in Botswana and German Agro Action in Ethiopia. She is also a former fellow at the Civic Data Design Lab at the MIT School of Architecture & Planning. Her online portfolio can be found here: kathartman.com. Follow her @kat_a_hartman.

Our second respondent, is Wayne State University Professor Marc W. Kruman, who chairs the Department of History, and is the founding Director of the Center for the Study of Citizenship. Professor Kruman is widely published. His current research focuses on the development of the interdisciplinary field of citizenship studies and the history of citizenship. He has been awarded an Andrew W. Mellon Faculty Fellowship in the Humanities at Harvard University and a National Endowment for the Humanities Research Fellowship. In 1999 he was a Fulbright Senior Lecturer at the University of Rome. At Wayne State University, he has received the President’s Award for Excellence in Teaching, the Board of Governors Faculty Recognition Award (twice) and a Board of Governors Distinguished Faculty Fellowship.

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Comparing Cable TV in Korea and the USA: Major Differences

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Following a presentation to visiting Korean executives, Professor Sung Wook Ji provided a brief summary of major differences between cable systems in the US and Korea. Professor JI was a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Media and Information at Michigan State University, and has recently been appointed to an Assistant Professorship at Southern Illinois University. He received a Ph.D. from the Dept. of Telecommunications at Indiana University, Bloomington. This brief video focuses on these dramatic differences.

Ji interview from Quello Center on Vimeo.

Sung Wook Ji’s primary research interests center on the interdisciplinary intersections of Mass Communication, Economics, and Media Policy. As an economist of the media, he is interested particularly in the social and economic impact of new media technologies on the media industry, and how these technologies are shaping the media industries and society. At the Quello Center, he has contributed to a variety of research activities and organised a lecture series for the University’s International Studies and Programs that reaches out to professionals from abroad, called the Visiting International Professional Program (VIPP).

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New Business Models for New Media

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Professor Constantinos K. Coursaris gave a seminar on the business models behind new media. In this short video, he is asked to summarize the new business models – and succinctly does so. Dr Coursaris is the Director of Graduate Studies and an Associate Professor and Associate Director in the Department of Media and Information in MSU’s College of Communication Arts and Sciences.

Coursaris Quello Interview from Quello Center on Vimeo.

Constantinos is also a Faculty Researcher in Usability/Accessibility Research and Consulting. In this area, he studies user motivations, expectations, and experiences with new media and the consequent design implications with a focus on social systems. His current research interests lie in the intersection of usability and mobile technologies for the purpose of health and/or commercial applications. You can follow him @DrCoursaris

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Johannes Bauer on Communication Policy Processes in the US

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This brief interview provides insights to key features of communication policy and regulatory processes in the US context. It is an interview with Professor Johannes Bauer, following a lecture he gave to visiting executives that allowed him to pursue these issues in depth. Discussing an overview of his more detailed presentation he gave to a Quello seminar, Professor Bauer argues that there is a new phase of experimentation around the development of principles and frameworks for the new media and information ecologies being shaped by the Internet and related innovations in information and communication technologies. Globally, many approaches are developing from the bottom-up, and there is, according to Professor Bauer, a distinctly American policy-making framework, which he outlines here.

Bauer Quello Interview from Quello Center on Vimeo.

Professor Bauer is Chair and Professor in the Department of Media and Information at Michigan State University. He is trained as an engineer and economist, holding MA and PhD degrees in economics from the Vienna University of Economics and Business Administration, Austria. While at MSU, he also had appointments as visiting professor at the Technical University of Delft, Netherlands (2000-2001), the University of Konstanz, Germany (Summer 2010), and most recently the University of Zurich, Switzerland (2012). Much of his research centers on policy issues critical to the Quello Center, such as around the regulation of telecommunications and the Internet, including work on net neutrality and cybersecurity.

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Charles Steinfield on Enterprise Social Media: Implications for Business Collaboration and Knowledge Management

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Prior to a presentation for the Quello Center, Professor Charles Steinfield was interviewed by Bill Dutton about his work on ‘enterprise social media’, the subject of this presentation. He explains what enterprise social media are, why they are becoming popular across business and industry, and their implications – intended and sometimes unintended. Charles Steinfield is a professor in the Department of Media and Information at Michigan State University. In addition to his faculty position, Steinfield participates with the MSU Eli Broad College of Business Information Technology Management Program and is a member of the campus-wide Faculty of Computing and Information. He is also a research associate in the Quello Center for Telecommunications Management and Law at MSU and a Faculty Associate for the MSU College of Law Intellectual Property and Communications Law Program. Professor Steinfield’s research focuses on the organizational and social impacts of new communication technologies, with recent projects examining the social capital implications of online social network sites, understanding barriers to industry-wide diffusion to e-commerce standards, and the role of ICTs in economic development.

Enterprise Social Media from Quello Center on Vimeo.

A recent article Professor Steinfield co-authored with his colleagues on the enterprise social media project is at: http://conferences.computer.org/hicss/2015/papers/7367a763.pdf

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Steve Wildman on the Future of Media Content Delivery

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The Quello Center Advisory Board identified the future of content delivery as one of the Center’s most critical issues for research. Late in 2014, Professor Steve Wildman provided an overview of the prospects for new forms of content delivery to a group of visiting executives. Prior to his lecture, Bill Dutton interviewed him about the key points he planned to cover. You’ve find this video of this interview to be a succinct summary of major issues facing the future of broadcasting and the media more generally. We’d welcome your comments – whether you agree to disagree with the future painted by Professor Wildman.

Delivering Media Content in a New Technological Environment: An Exploration of Policy Implications from Quello Center on Vimeo.

His video is at: https://vimeo.com/110827928

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Communication, Communication, Communication: A Jet-lagged Bill Interviewed by Voices from Oxford

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During my recent visit to Oxford for an Advisory Board Meeting, and Awards Ceremony for the Oxford Internet Institute, I had the pleasure of an impromptu interview with the Director of Voices from Oxford, Dr Sung Hee Kim. You might enjoy the production, the American music, the images from Korea and Oxford, and might also want to challenge my views on the centrality of communication for students from any nation, called ‘Communication in the Modern Age’. The interview is on Voices from Oxford (VOX):

Communication in the Modern Age from Voices from Oxford on Vimeo.

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ICT for Development in Agricultural Sectors, Professor Steinfield

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We had a brief interview with Professor Charles Steinfield before a seminar he presented on the role of information and communication technologies for development, focusing on their role in the agricultural context. Distilling key lessons learned from his field research with Professor Susan Wyche, he touches on the kinds of technologies being used, the implications of their use, and the barriers to further success. This brief overview conveys the substantive areas he addressed in more depth in the seminar that followed. See the short video at: https://vimeo.com/110827930

Professor Steinfield’s work is supported by USAID, which funds MSU’s Global Center for Food Systems Innovation (GCFSI). A copy of his report with Susan Wyche on ICTs and development is available from the GCFSI web site at http://gcfsi.isp.msu.edu.

ICT4D in Agriculture

ICT4D in Agriculture

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Reflections on the Quello Lecture on Racism and Sexism in the Gamer Community by Avshalom Ginosar

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“Racism, Sexism, and Video Games: Social Justice Campaigns and the Struggle for Gamer Identity”. This was the title of the first Quello Lecture for the new academic year. Professor Lisa Nakamura introduced several extreme examples of sexism and racism, but the real issue of the lecture and of the audience’s comments was not merely the prominence of some very ugly and disgusting phenomena in the gaming world. Rather, it was the interface between the gaming universe and the real world; it was about culture and culture wars, about social justice warriors, about women and men, about feminism and anti-feminism, and about how relationships travel across these different worlds. And yes, it was about avatars as well.

Racism, Sexism, and Video Games: Social Justice Campaigns and the Struggle for Gamer Identity from Quello Center on Vimeo.

To what extent do our fake images allow some of us (I mean the gamers) to be nasty – and even criminal – in the gaming world? Professor Robby Rattan, after a wonderful rap show about quantitative and qualitative research, raised the idea that if gamers could have a fake image which is far from a human one (not just human bodies without arms, for example), something totally fictional, if I may add, maybe some disgusting human characteristics (such as sexism and racism) would be vanished. You must admit that it is a very attractive idea.

Oh, I almost forgot, there was wonderful light refreshment before the lecture, and there was a drinks reception after the lecture (which I did not attend because I had to hurry for my evening walk with my wife. Sorry). The whole event took place at the very busy Kellogg Conference Center (we could hear the voices and buzz of other events through the walls), contributing to a very promising beginning for the Quello Lectures to follow.

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To view more pictures from Dr. Nakamura’s lecture, please visit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/quellocenter/sets/72157648470967778/

 

Avshalom Ginosar, PhD

Communication Department, The Academic College of Yezreel Valley

Visiting Scholar, The Quello Center, The Department of Media & Information, The College of Communication Art & Science, Michigan State University

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