The Next Generation of Broadcasting: A Talk by Vincent Curren

Friday, October 6th, 2017

Vincent Curren, Principal at Breakthrough Public Media Consulting, Inc., provided his perspective on the future of public broadcasting, focusing on the new IP-based standard created by the Advanced Television Systems Committee (ATSC), called ATSC 3.0. This new standard will enable real synergies between the Internet and broadcasting, and much much more. So join us to learn about the future of public broadcasting, and the next generation of television, as well as developments on the ground here in East Lansing at WKAR.

Quello Center presents: Next Generation Broadcasting by Vincent Curren from Quello Center on Vimeo.

Biographical Sketch of Speaker

Vincent Curren is principal of Breakthrough Public Media Consulting, a firm that helps public media companies navigate today’s dynamic and competitive media world. Vinnie is working with the Public Media Company to help public television stations leverage the power of ATSC 3.0, the next generation, broadcast television standard.

Before leaving to start his own firm, Vinnie served as Chief Operating Officer of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, a position that he held for nearly a decade. While at CPB, Vinnie had overall responsibility for managing station policy, grant-making and station support activities, ensuring that all Americans receive robust public media services for free and commercial-free. Prior to being named COO, Vinnie was the Senior Vice President for Radio at CPB.
Vinnie has been a major market station general manager (WXPN, Philadelphia), has held programming, fundraising, and engineering positions in radio, been a commercial television producer/director, and has served on the boards of the Development Exchange (now Greater Public) and the Station Resource Group. Vinnie holds a BA from SUNY Buffalo (Psychology) and an MS from the University of Pennsylvania (Organizational Dynamics)

Colleagues Toast Completion of WILMA Reports

Saturday, December 17th, 2016

Aleks Yankelevich and Mitch Shapiro toast (with new Quello mugs!) the completion of their two reports, both of which were central to a major Quello Center project on Wireless Innovation in Last Mile Access (WILMA). Aleks led the report on regulatory issues surrounding key spectrum of value to wireless, and Mitch led the report on business strategy case studies of wireless initiatives. Both reports will be released in the coming months when reviews are completed.

New Quello Project on the Last Mile of Access – WILMA

Monday, July 25th, 2016

The Quello Center has launched a promising project with the Quilt, a network of those providing Internet links to research and educational institutions, called RENs (Research and Educational Networks). We are helping them look at the policy issues such as in spectrum use, and business models, through a set of case studies, that might help them leap across the last mile of access to deep rural areas but also distressed areas of metropolitan regions. Wireless is the most obvious solution to this last mile, but understanding the changing technical, regulatory, industry, and financial constraints and opportunities will be challenging. The project title is Wireless Innovation for Last Mile Access (WILMA). More information is on our research site at: http://quello.msu.edu/research/wireless-innovation-for-last-mile-access/

Bill Dutton in front of MERIT for our first meeting.

Bill Dutton in front of MERIT for our first meeting.

Johannes Bauer on Communication Policy Processes in the US

Sunday, February 15th, 2015

This brief interview provides insights to key features of communication policy and regulatory processes in the US context. It is an interview with Professor Johannes Bauer, following a lecture he gave to visiting executives that allowed him to pursue these issues in depth. Discussing an overview of his more detailed presentation he gave to a Quello seminar, Professor Bauer argues that there is a new phase of experimentation around the development of principles and frameworks for the new media and information ecologies being shaped by the Internet and related innovations in information and communication technologies. Globally, many approaches are developing from the bottom-up, and there is, according to Professor Bauer, a distinctly American policy-making framework, which he outlines here.

Bauer Quello Interview from Quello Center on Vimeo.

Professor Bauer is Chair and Professor in the Department of Media and Information at Michigan State University. He is trained as an engineer and economist, holding MA and PhD degrees in economics from the Vienna University of Economics and Business Administration, Austria. While at MSU, he also had appointments as visiting professor at the Technical University of Delft, Netherlands (2000-2001), the University of Konstanz, Germany (Summer 2010), and most recently the University of Zurich, Switzerland (2012). Much of his research centers on policy issues critical to the Quello Center, such as around the regulation of telecommunications and the Internet, including work on net neutrality and cybersecurity.

The FCC and the Future of Communication Policy: A Quello Center Communication Policy Forum

Thursday, April 24th, 2014

Play video Watch the panel on the C-SPAN website.

The Quello Center organised a DC Policy Forum about the future of the FCC and its role in the regulation of digital media. Moderated by Richard Wiley, the panel featured individuals with years of experience in the regulation of communication in a discussion that ranged across a wide array of issues.

quello-fcc-coverModerator: Richard E. Wiley, Chairman of Wiley Rein LLP, a Washington, DC law firm, and is a former Chairman, Commissioner and General Counsel of the Federal Communications Commission (1970-77)

Panelists:
Rachelle Chong – Commissioner Chong had the honor of serving with Jim Quello as a colleague from 1994-1997 on the Federal Communications Commission.
Michael J. Copps – Michael J. Copps served two terms as a Member of the Federal Communications Commission, from 2001 through 2011—the seventh longest-serving Commissioner in the history of the agency.
Susan Ness – Senior Fellow at Johns Hopkins University’s SAIS Center for Transatlantic Relations, Susan Ness is a former FCC commissioner (1994 – 2001) and founder of Susan Ness Strategies, a communications policy consulting firm.
Michael K. Powell – Michael K. Powell is the President and CEO of the National Cable & Telecommunications Association.
Henry M. Rivera – Henry M. Rivera, a partner with Wiley Rein, LLP, specializes in representing companies before the Federal Communications Commission, Congress, the Commerce Department and the White House.

Monday of this week would have been Jim Quello’s 100th birthday. For 23½ years as a Commissioner, including nearly a year as Acting Chairman, Jim helped the FCC and the United States chart a path through a period, when like today, rapid changes in the communications sector and its core technologies posed challenges to established regulatory paradigms. Jim’s 100th birthday is an opportune time to reflect again on the FCC’s role in communications policy and how the Commission might best help the U.S. reap the benefits from technological advances in the communications sector.

Use #QuelloCenterPolicyForum to tweet about the event!

Download the event program (PDF).

Sponsor: MSU Intellectual Property, Information & Communications Law Program

Steven Wildman Appointed As Chief Economist for the FCC

Saturday, January 5th, 2013

swildman
FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski announced today the appointment of Steven Wildman to the position of FCC Chief Economist. Professor Wildman, an expert on communications and media issues, will commence his role in January 2013. Chairman Genachowski said, “I’m very pleased that Steve will be joining the Commission. He has a stellar record as an economist and has conducted important research on broadband adoption and spectrum management, among other topics. The Chief Economist’s role and office are critical to the agency’s work and its understanding of complex economic issues related to the communications sector. “I would also like to commend and thank our outgoing Chief Economist Marius Schwartz. Marius was an outstanding Chief Economist, who applied his deep economic expertise and problem solving abilities daily to our most challenging initiatives. The Commission has relied heavily on his input and analysis to make key decisions, and his work substantially bolstered the FCC’s economic capabilities.”

Wildman will take over as Chief Economist from Schwartz, who is returning to his prior role as a Professor of Economics at Georgetown University. Wildman’s teaching and research focus on economics, law and policy across the communications industry, and the impact of information technologies on the organization of economic activities. He has conducted detailed research on broadband adoption examining infrastructure cost structures and demand in rural and underserved areas. He has also studied the efficiency properties of alternative spectrum governance regimes and network interconnection policy.

He has held numerous fellowships and received prominent awards, including the Information and Telecommunications Education and Research Association Distinguished Research Award, the Journal of Media Economics Award of Honor for Scholarly Contributions, and the McGannon Award for Social and Ethical Relevance in Communications Policy Research.

Prior to joining Michigan State University, Wildman was an Associate Professor at Northwestern University’s Department of Communications Studies. He has also worked at the University of California’s Department of Economics. Wildman holds a Ph.D in Economics from Stanford University, as well as an M.A. and a B.A. degree in Economics from Stanford University and Wabash College respectively.