Statement of Commissioner James H. Quello at the NCTA Convention

Monday, August 7th, 2017


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Separate Statement of Commissioner James H. Quello In the Matter of Amendment of the Commission’s Rules to Establish New Personal Communications Services

Tuesday, August 1st, 2017


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Talking about the politics of the Fifth Estate with students in Lisbon

Saturday, March 11th, 2017

Talk on the politics of the Fifth Estate at University Institute of Lisbon, March 2017

Fake News Roundtable: Featuring Approaches to Academic Research

Thursday, March 2nd, 2017

On March 3, the Quello Center co-hosted a roundtable on Fake News with the Department of Media and Information and the College of Communication Arts and Sciences. Talks by Winson Peng, Esther Thorson, David Ewolsen, Keith Hampton, and Rachel Mourao kicked off a wide-ranging discussion. Each colleague seemed to approach the topic from their theoretical or methodological home, whether data science, journalism, social psychology or Internet studies, so I was left hoping for this discussion to help foster more inter-disciplinary collaboration. That said, the unique perspective of each academic was stimulating.

From a Quello Center perspective, I asked how we can reframe this discussion and their various research topics in ways that will have a longer shelf-life and impact on policy and practice. When fake news fades as a hot button issue, how will their research continue to be viewed as relevant. My own sense is that the real issue is the more enduring one of quality news, and how to define it, produce it, and support its consumption.

We hope to have more roundtables like this one, which drew colleagues from across the College. Many thanks to Dean Prabu David, Department Chair Johannes Bauer, and other heads for supporting this, and for the many doctoral students who attended. Our Assistant Director, Dr Bibi Reisdorf, expertly moderated the discussion and summarized key points. Thanks to all.

Bill Dutton

Fake News: A Roundtable Discussion from Quello Center on Vimeo.

The Idea of a Cyber Security Mindset

Tuesday, January 24th, 2017

What is a cyber security mindset and why is it important?

Quello’s Professor of Media and Information Policy has just published an article in Internet Policy Review, a journal on Internet regulation, entitled ‘Fostering a Cyber Security Mindset’. It seeks to introduce the concept and suggest ways in which research on who has such a mindset and what difference it can make to cyber security can be furthered. It is available free online at: https://policyreview.info/articles/analysis/fostering-cyber-security-mindset

http://www.billbrotherton.co.uk/mindset/

Dutton, William. (2017), ‘Fostering a Cyber Security Mindset’, Internet Policy Review, 6(1): DOI: 10.14763/2017.1.443

Digital Archive of James Quello’s Papers

Thursday, December 8th, 2016

The Quello Center is off and running in creating a digital archive of James H. Quello’s papers. Our archive team includes myself, having never created such an archive, plus Anne Marie Salter at the Center, Valeta Winsloff from Media and Information who supports our design work and blogging, Scout Calvert with the MSU Library, who is orchestrating this project, and Lauren E. Lincoln-Chavez, who has hands on experience in developing archives and special collections, and is based in Detroit.

The collection contains over 1,000 papers, including speeches, statements, letters, and remarks by James Quello during his long tenure as an FCC Commissioner. To this we will be adding our collection of photographs, and videos, as well as photos of his many awards and honors. This promises to be another of the many fun and rewarding projects of the Center.

The archive will be part of our WordPress blog and publicly accessible to anyone who might want a view of over two decades at the FCC through the words of one of its longest serving and most colorful commissioners. I read one of his papers from 1974 saying the he is willing to forgive journalists for getting things wrong at times (before there was a term ‘fake news’) in order to protect freedom of the press, and I imagine he would say the same thing about the users of social media today.

Generally, sifting through this collection is addictive as you follow the history of such issues as the fairness doctrine, cross-ownership rules, and more. I’ll keep you posted on our progress.

LtoR: Aleks, Bill, Valeta, Anne Marie, Lauren, Scout

Congratulations to R.V. Rikard from your Quello Center Colleagues

Saturday, July 23rd, 2016

The Quello Center congratulates Dr. R.V. Rikard on his promotion to a Senior Research Associate in MSU’s Department of Media and Information. Over the last two years, Dr Rikard has become a highly valued – go to – colleague for our Center. He has helped on grant proposals in the areas of big data, complex data management, and more. In announcing this promotion, Professor Johannes Bauer, Chair of the Department, praised R.V.’s excellence in methods and statistics, which he brings to his work on Trifecta (Technology and Innovation for Health), with Professor Shelia Cotten, but also shares to the entire department.

Research Team Members R.V. Rikard, Bibi Reisdorf, Mitch Shapiro, Aleks Yankelevich

Research Team Members R.V. Rikard, Bibi Reisdorf, Mitch Shapiro, Aleks Yankelevich

Intellectually curious, R.V. is a regular participant in Quello Center lectures, seminars, and events, bringing his sense of humor and sharp wit into the academic climate of the College of Communication Arts & Sciences. He is a strong contributor to our academic community. He even follows us on Twitter @QuelloCenter and Facebook.

So keep retweeting, R.V., and congratulations. Seriously well done. All of us at the Quello Center look forward to continuing our collaboration. You can count on us to keep darkening your door.

Dr Bianca Reisdorf Advances on Two Tracks

Thursday, July 21st, 2016

It is official. Dr Bibi Reisdorf has been promoted both in the Quello Center and in the Department of Media and Information of our College of Communication Arts and Sciences at MSU.

In the Quello Center, Dr Reisdorf will be Assistant Director, working to support the Center’s research, outreach, and development. Bibi joined the Quello Center just last year as a Quello Post-Doctoral Fellow in Media and Information Policy. She came to us from the University of Leicester, where she was a Lecturer and Director of Distance Learning in their Department of Media and Communication. She has also been an adjunct professor at the University of Cincinnati. But it was not only her experience that merited her promotion.

At the Center, Bibi’s commitment and innovative approaches to research on digital inequalities have proven to be catalytic to a number of grant proposals and publications. Her role in outreach for the Center has been remarkable also. So we will not just be keeping Bibi at the Center, but enabling her to play an even greater role.

In the Department, Bibi was awarded a position as assistant professor. In this role, Professor Reisdorf will be redeveloping and teaching the department’s new undergraduate research methods course, and will be able to play a more active role in building the rising academic profile of the Department and College.

When I was at the University of Oxford, Bibi Reisdorf became a doctoral student, and soon took on an important role as a research assistant on the Oxford Internet Surveys (OxIS), which tracked the use and impact of the Internet in Britain from 2003 through 2013. Bibi demonstrated such a natural gift and remarkable acumen for quantitative analyses and survey research that she became a valued member of the OxIS team from her first days. It has been a delight to see her bring such talent to the department and the Quello Center at MSU.

Ruth Shillair and Bibi Reisdorf (name tag)

Ruth Shillair and Bibi Reisdorf (name tag)

Bianca received her D.Phil. degree in Information, Communication and the Social Sciences at the Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford, in 2012, having completed an M.A. in Sociology at the University of Bielefeld, Germany, in 2008.

Christine Borgman’s Quello Lecture in October 2016

Wednesday, June 29th, 2016

Professor Christine Borgman, UCLA’s Presidential Chair in Information Studies, and a member of the Quello Center Advisory Board, will be giving a Quello Lecture on the 5th of October 2016 at MSU’s College of Arts and Sciences. Her latest book is entitled Big Data, Little Data, No Data, which I interviewed her about for Voices from Oxford (VOX). My VOX interview with Christine was done when we were both at Balliol College and is at: http://www.voicesfromoxford.org/video/data-in-the-digital-domain/228 The interview is brief, just over 15 minutes, but I hope it will give you a sense of the wide range of topics that Christine is likely to develop here at MSU.

Christine did her undergraduate degree here at MSU, and remains a loyal alum, and went on to a number of higher degrees, including a doctorate from Stanford in communication. You might notice the music introducing and concluding the video seems to accentuate our American accents, thanks to Sung Hee Kim, Director of VOX.

Christine Borgman

Online Education by A. Michael Noll

Wednesday, June 29th, 2016

Online Education

A. Michael Noll

June 29, 2016

© 2016 AMN

We have been told for decades that technology will reform education. I recall the filmstrip projector and the movie projector and their promise for education – they ended up in the closets of schools. And then along came educational television and distance learning over interactive closed-circuit video – known as tele-education. Today it is the Internet – e-learning and virtual universities.

All these technologies have a role and perhaps are useful – but not a one reformed education. They did offer more alternatives for some students – as did the Open University in England.

For some students who are able to study and learn on their own, educational technologies offer an alternative to the brick-and-mortar institutions. But so too did the postal service of the past and its use by correspondence schools. Textbooks offer personalized distance learning at the student’s pace, and many even have questions and lessons at the end of chapters.

In the end, a key factor is the motivation of the student. A motivated student can learn from a book – or a video – or an Internet course. But then there is the issue of grading and certification.

The Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) promises education to thousands of students and interaction with other students, and even professors. But how can a professor interact individually with thousands of students? Most professors have office hours and are not that easily available. The MOOC seems similar to UHF TV courses of years ago, except now over the Internet with a wider audience. Interactive TV of the past offered interaction, so even the interaction of the Internet is not new. However, the newer aspect of MOOC is the “Massive” audience that is possible through the Internet and World Wide Web.

In the end, the gold standard continues to be the classroom and the social interactions that occur at conventional institutions. But the tuition for this gold standard seems to have outpaced the inflation of gold bricks. It is not faculty pay that has increased that rapidly, but bureaucrats and administrators – and a reluctance by universities to use endowments to fund student scholarships and thus keep costs under control.

A. Michael Noll

A. Michael Noll